United States
Diplomatic Service Buttons
1795 to 1863

 

* Scottish Artisan Design *

 

  Draft in Progress July 15, 2018,

     

 

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Right from the establishment of the U.S. Federal government in 1789, our founding fathers understood the importance of foreign national ties in establishing America as a Sovereign Nation on the World’s Stage. In this era of our country’s founding, the Continental Congress’s emissaries used the Scottish Revolutionaries European Aristocratic ties as an entrance into the French diplomatic theatre for the Patriot’s Cause. The aristocratic relationships provided by Dr. Benjamin Franklin earlier during the Revolution, and then post-war by Thomas Jefferson as second Minister (1785-89), helped establish the foundation for U.S. foreign policies and trade. When Thomas Jefferson returned from France in 1789, George Washington would appoint him as, America’s 1st Secretary of State. From this newly erected cabinet position, the Jacobite Gentry (Council of Scottish Revolutionaries), Founders, and George Washington’s Administration’s would be able to wield specific influence and direction over foreign agreements. When the States ratified a new Constitutional Federal government in 1789, all the pieces of the chess board were being incorporated to move in concert, even as individual pieces were deployed one move at a time. One has to open his lens and see how the orchestration of necessary foreign moves plays into a positive network to establish the U.S. Federal Policy to benefit all State interests of the Gentry. 

     The ground work for foreign diplomacy in the United States begins in 1776, with Master Statesman Dr. Benjamin franklin. He was America’s 1st Diplomatic Minister to France. Years prior, Benjamin Franklin was one of the first patriots in 1754 to call for the, “Unification of the States” at the Albany of Congress. Ever since that rally-cry for a grass-roots movement, he was astute enough to utilize the era’s media and insert commentary and propaganda under pen names to illustrate the inequalities of the colonists. We reasonably assume by his decades of Patriot Cause of networking interactions through neighborhood Scottish-Rite lodges, and clubs like, “Junto,” Benjamin Franklin was best suited to represent the embodiment of, “Science based Enlightenment” which represented the Cause’s, “New Ideals” which was offered by an independent American Republic.

www.georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com/propaganda-movement   

     Appointed a diplomatic agent of Congress in 1776, Benjamin Franklin was faced with the complexity of how to access the French political theatre in-order to gain monetary and military support for the Patriot’s Cause. Franklin understood the Patriots would need the vast resources of King Louis XVI’s French court, and the process of diplomatic acknowledgment would be slow in the making. Realizing the speed of the political process, we believe Benjamin Franklin had a strategy to go under the political veil of the French Court, and use an established network of Scottish-Rite Masonic kinship, Illuminati idealists, and other family ties of America’s Scottish Revolutionaries. For Benjamin Franklin and the aristocratic Scottish Revolutionaries in America, France was seen as a Sanctuary country for the Scottish Royal Culture’s Ideals which coincide with the Patriot’s struggle.

In this era, Scottish Royal families living in exile were barred from the European political realm of British power gave the Revolutionaries an avenue to gain an aristocratic undercurrent of sympathetic support for the Patriot’s Cause. These Scottish-French aristocratic ties under the official political veil of diplomacy were linked-up with Benjamin Franklins gift of Sciences. With his innovative mechanics and new science introductions, the Continental Army was able to secure small amounts of monetary support from the sympathetic French aristocratic class before 1778. The French Court was an important avenue for Benjamin Franklin and the American Revolutionaries. It was viewed as one of only a few means to gain the much needed monetary and military support for the Continental Army.

     Finally in February of 1778, with George Washington’s victory at the Battles of Saratoga in September & October of 1777, Benjamin Franklin was able to convince King Louis XVI of France and the remaining aristocratic skeptics, that the colonists could win in their struggle for independence over the British. This should be viewed as the Patriot’s first diplomatic victory, which would lead to an official U.S. political platform in the following years. Also, this successful accomplishment would earn Benjamin Franklin the distinction of being America’s 1st Minister to be received by a foreign government. For the remainder of the Revolutionary War, Benjamin Franklin was able to lay foundations and negotiate to carry-out Congressional diplomacy elsewhere in Europe. 

Thomas Jefferson starts his fabled foreign diplomatic career as, “America’s Second Minister” to France from 1785 to 1789. This is where Jefferson will play a pivotal role in establishing European political relationships; and providing important groundwork for his future successors.  In 1785, when Thomas Jefferson arrived in Paris France, the French Foreign Minister, Vergennes asked, “It is you who replaced Dr. Franklin?” Jefferson replied, “No one can replace him, Sir, I am only his successor.” This humbleness and respect for Dr. Franklin’s station is represented by his statement of admiration. Unlike Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson’s avenue into the aristocracy was through the Illuminati, and their Liberated Ideals of Enlightenment. Upon his return from France in 1789, Thomas Jefferson was appointed by George Washington as the United States First Secretary of State. This newly established State Department only operated two diplomatic posts, and 10 consular posts. The Cabinet Office in the Administration under Jefferson only consisted of a chief clerk, three assistant clerks, and a messenger.  In 1791 the total domestic and foreign expenditures of Jefferson’s State Department was only $56,000.

     In 1779, John Adams was able to harness his law abilities into becoming a Master Statesman with exceptional Legislative abilities. He held two key Minister positions during his time serving in the Continental Congress. First, starting in 1779, he was appointed Minister to Great Britain with plenipotentiary powers of negotiation. This prior  experience as a Congressional emissary gave him the procedure and understanding to assume the role of First Minister to the Court of St. James in London in 1785. In November of 1782, he worked with Benjamin Franklin and John Jay in drafting official legislative rights which gave the United States sovereignty over its own fisheries along the Atlantic seaboard. Like a Master legislator, John Adams was able to concomitantly work on the Treaty of Paris to end the Revolutionary War in 1783, and act as a foreign Minister to the Netherlands; where he was able to convince the Dutch bankers to recognize America’s Independence, and financially bankroll the nearly bankrupt Continental Congress.

   John Quincy Adams, son of President John Adams had a remarkable diplomatic career in the years following the American Revolution. His started his career as the Minister to the Netherlands in 1794 during George Washington’s Second Administration. When his father John Adams assumed the Presidency in 1797, he immediately appointed him Minister to Prussia (Berlin) which carried through his first administration to 1801. After serving in Congress for 8 years, he reentered the diplomatic service in 1809, as a Minister to Russia. He was also credited later for being the chief negotiator for the Treaty of Ghent in 1814, which ended the War of 1812.  Shortly, right after the Ghent treaty negotiations, President James Madison appointed him as U.S. Minister to the Court of St. James in London. This Ministership lasted from 1815 until 1817 when he assumed the role of Secretary of State, and served under President James Monroe from 1817 to 1825. John Quincy Adams was responsible for a lot of Diplomatic  representation to further America’s goal of sovereignty. As Secretary of State in 1819, he negotiated, drafted, and signed with Spain the Adams-Onis (Transcontinental) Treaty. This agreement allowed Florida to cede to the United States, and established a frontier line between the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean.  By 1823, John Quincy Adams himself was a major legislative force in crafting the Monroe Doctrine (named for the President and not his Secretary of State).  The proclamation officially declared that the “the American continents…are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers,” and pledged the United States to defend the territorial integrity of all of the nascent republics of the two Americas. The Monroe Doctrine enabled the United States to set the tone and ground rules for all future United States–European relations in dealing with issues relating to the Western Hemisphere. 

 

     If you are interested in collecting Official Diplomatic Service buttons, you should realize that the early OD buttons were most likely worn by the Military escort or Attaché personal who would often accompanied the American Diplomat. As for the diplomat himself, he most likely wore his finest silks, and had Special Federal Style Gilt pin made like exampled under OD 1. 

Draft continues.

My lens is focused on showing how “All Areas” were impacted by the Scottish Revolutionaries influence. I am trying to show the unseen Scottish ties and bonds not only behind the insignia, but behind the positive networking of individuals taking place simultaneously in France and America. These Official Diplomatic Service buttons could serve as another piece of evidence that Scottish Revolutionaries and Artisans were orchestrating and taking the necessary nation building steps by providing the right messaged insignia buttons. By US Diplomats using Scottish Artisan designed buttons it could have easily reinforced foreign aristocratic and political ties. Official Diplomatic Service button collectors should also note, As with the introduction of the Federal Government’s new insignia of the Great Seal on the 1789 New Nation Tribute Buttons, the Official Diplomatic Button series would be considered the 1st official office to use a Federal Button that has a variation of the Great Seal of the United States. To help button collectors follow the lineage of Eagle Artistry in American Federal buttons collectors can find cross-resemblances in the original Federal Army 1792-98 eagle buttons, and then later OD patterns used by Infantry Officer’s buttons in 1812-15 (Alberts GI 50 Series).  

As America’s commercial interests expanded the State Department became Americas highest ranking and important cabinet department.  It would be reasonable assumed that the State Department should and would be represented by a variation of the Great Seal of the United States. Each new Federal office adopted it’s own variation to help identify it’s special office. As a seasoned button collector, I feel US Official Diplomatic Service Buttons is the Best place for a New Collectors to start into the hobby. You have a chance to learn America’s history with these Beautifully crafted buttons.

   The Official Diplomat button insignia contains Allusions symbols which provides a window into the homages associated with the individuals who constructively helped America establish it’s roots beyond the political veil. From the meaning behind the stripes on the shield to the use of European Royal Culture symbols cloaked under the disguise America’s newly adapted insignia. To understand the context of the “use of” OD button’s symbols, one must open their lens and adjust to all the variables going on by multiple players. 

 

1790-1802 official diplomatic service OD 1 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1790-1802 official diplomatic service OD 1 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1795 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Deep Woods Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 25mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 1: RV 100
Variation: Robert Scot Design / Eagle Standing on Palm Branch / Wreath in Beak.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This button’s pattern was designed by Robert Scot and depicts an Eagle Standing on a Palm Branch facing left with a Wreath in it’s Beak.  Circling around the legend is the country’s name,”UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” in Roman font capital letters. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field to edge.  Dale Hawley was instrumental in providing the cross-match dated research to serve as evidence that Scottish Artisan Robert Scot designed the 1st official Diplomat button. Dale was also able to furnish the eagle patterns origin back to 44BC – 46BC Syria as depicted in the coins illustrations below. The  engraving of the steel die was made here in America by Scot or the Scottish Artisans under his umbrella, and the button was most likely produced in England. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. GILT / Floral Design Ring W/ 6 Point Star in bottom legend rm. 2 ring Chanel. 

Robert, do you think the (illuminati master spy) American diplomat Ben Franklin while working with the French during the Rev War, and then later after the war ended, was wearing a Statesmen Diplomatic button like mine (middle pin below) with his fine formal dress wear / garments? Benjamin Franklin never dressed in any type of military dress with solid brass gilt button when he ended his Ambassadorship in 1785 with France. I agree with that.

     For all we know Robert Scot copied one of these men’s personal Diplomatic buttons for design of the gold coin in 1795, or the 1795 OD-1 button. Perhaps, Thomas Jefferson wore a military uniform?  “I don’t think so,” another illuminati steward  when he was the Ambassador to France from 1785- 1789.  William Short Ambassador to France 1790-1792 never wore a Military uniform either…  ” I don’t think so.”  Lastly, there was Gouverneur Morris 1792-1794 Ambassador to France. These men during George Washington’s time in office were all well connected, sophisticated, and wealthy. They would have worn their best silk or fine clothing with a symbol of the United States Gold Gilt Enamel button. I believe the guards from the United States would have worn buttons like OD-1 because they were military men. These men would have worn a button like the one I submitted to you, and the button would have been made in France. Perhaps even a gift to one of these early American Ambassadors. A Gold Gilt with enamel. The French made the most sophisticated multi blended material buttons in the world in the 18th century. -Dale H.

Dale,
       I appreciate your understanding of 18th century era’s social etiquette, and enjoy our insights throughout our correspondence. I think you have come along way in your understanding Scottish Royal Culture and now think you definitely have a firm grasp in understanding how Robert Scot used his artistry skills while he infused America’s federal insignia. Since, my time is very limited with writing, I really have appreciated your willingness upon my many requests to help me illustrate with graphs for our readers in the button community. This makes my life easier to continue with my research.  – Your Friend Robert

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert’s Notes: The secrecy (or lack of information) surrounding the Artisan & Year of America’s 1st Official Diplomat button just serves as another piece of evidence that Robert Scot was acting as an authoritative International Artisan Guild President (placed into power by Scottish Gentry in Scotland, Italy, France & England). As a hidden Superior in the sect of Strict Observance in Freemasonry he was able to control designs offered by the guild artisans to Congressional Committees who would be responsible for authorizing insignia designs. Robert Scot should be viewed as a hidden Master-Thinker-Artisan who was ultimately behind the designs of most Americas new Federal insignia. The first Diplomatic button depicting Robert Scots earlier workings can serve as direct evidence that this was the case. I believe Robert Scot was taking positive founding measures in artistry with George Washington & his Council of Scottish Gentry Revolutionaries. With the new societal construct of the Grand Architects Design in place, these artisans had the historical knowledge, training, and proper authority by Robert Scot’s family gentry association. These men of the educated gentry class understood the importance of granting religious authority and heraldry “Through George Washington,” as the father of a country, but embed their Scottish Royal Culture which belonged to the House of Stuart into the Federal architecture and artistry. 

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The RJ. Silverstein Collection

 

 

1798-1802 US Official Diplomatic 25mm J. Baldwin georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1798-1802 US Official Diplomatic 25mm J. Baldwin georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

 

1796-1802 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Green With Gilt Remnants.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 25mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 2-A: RV 50
Variation: Scottish-Rite Federal Eagle / 13 Arrows Equal in Length / 15 Petal Olive Branch / E. Pluribus Unum.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This rare button depicts a Scottish-Rite Style version of the Federal Eagle. This early style Eagle pattern was first introduced on federal insignias, including state official dress buttons that were used during Washington’s Administration. There appears to be two pattern variation between the coat and cuff. The differance being in the position of how the arrows are bundled, the number of olive branch petals, the size of the eagle’s head, and the width of the shield. The button’s pattern depicts a variation of the 1782 Great Seal of the United States. In the center of the button is a Federal Type Eagle that has a Federal Striped Shield over it’s chest. Within the shield there are 13 Stripes to represent the states that joined the union in 1789. In the Eagle’s left talon is a bundle of Thirteen Arrows that are Equal in Length pointing upwards to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Short Stem 15 Petal Olive Branch. In the Eagle’s beak is a flowing banner ribbon with the motto, “E. Pluribus Unum” in Roman font capital letters. The motto means, out of one, many. This gives reference to the 7 nations that peopled the united states. Circling the outside legend is 16 Six-Pointed Stars. This could represent when Tennessee joined the Union on June 1st 1796. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. CARTER* LOMBARD STREET* 2 rm rope rings.  

 

 

 

 

1798-1802 US Diplomateic Service 15.71mm Gilt Brass Orig Shank OD2Av. RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1798-1802 US Diplomateic Service 15.71mm Gilt Brass Orig Shank OD2Av. RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1796-1802 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Green With Gilt Remnants.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 15.71mm. Cuff Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 2-Av: RV 40
Variation: Scottish-Rite Federal Eagle / 13 Arrows Combine in 2 Lengths / 13 Petal Olive Branch / E. Pluribus Unum.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This rare button depicts a Scottish-Rite Style version of the Federal Eagle. This early style Eagle pattern was first introduced on federal insignias, including state official dress buttons that were used during Washington’s Administration. There appears to be two pattern variation between the coat and cuff. The differance being in the position of how the arrows are bundled, the number of olive branch petals, the size of the eagle’s head, and the width of the shield. The button’s pattern depicts a variation of the 1782 Great Seal of the United States. In the center of the button is a Federal Type Eagle that has a Federal Striped Shield over it’s chest. Within the shield there are 13 Stripes to represent the states that joined the union in 1789. In the Eagle’s left talon is a bundle of Thirteen Arrows that are Combine in 2 Lengths pointing upward to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Short Stem 13 Petal Olive Branch. In the Eagle’s beak is a flowing banner ribbon with the motto, “E. Pluribus Unum” in Roman font capital letters. The motto means, out of one, many. This gives reference to the 7 nations that peopled the united states. Circling the outside legend is 16 Six-Pointed Stars. This could represent when Tennessee joined the Union on June 1st 1796. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. CARTER* LOMBARD STREET* 2 rm cable rings.

The RJ Silverstein Collection.

 

 

1800 Official Diplomat Button OD 2Av 16mm RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R 1800 Official Diplomat Button OD 2Av 16mm RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O

1798-1802 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Brown Gilt Remnants.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 16mm. Cuff Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 2-Av: RV 25
Variation: Earlier Style Federal Eagle /  Thirteen Arrows / E. Pluribus Unum / 16 Six-Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: An Dug Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This is the cuff button made to match OD 2. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Eagle facing right. On the Eagle’s chest is a Federal Striped Shield. In the Eagle’s left talon is a bundle of Thirteen Arrows pointing upwards, and to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Short Stem 7 Petal Olive Branch. In the Eagle’s beak is a flowing banner ribbon with the motto, “E. Pluribus Unum” in Roman font capital letters. The motto means, out of one many. Circling the outside legend is 16 Six-Pointed Stars. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. CARTER* LOMBARD STREET* within 2 stipple rm rings.

 

 

1808-1820-u-s-federal-dragoon-officer-23mm-gilt-brass-orig-shank-dug-in-newfane-v-t-rj-silversteins-georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons-com-o

1798-1810 Federal Dragoon Officers > Diplomatic Attache Button

Color: A Brownish-Orange.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23.01mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: Unknown Federal Diplomatic Dragoon Detachment RV 500!
Variation: Federal Eagle / Dragoon / E. Plurbus Unum / Olive Branch / 15 Arrows.
Present Condition: A Dug Specimen, A Good Planchet Condition Remains, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: A Federal Dragoon officers special order button (instead of Fed. Issue). These distinct officers were commissioned to act as a military consul, or act as a small guard for a federal diplomat. This group of officers traveled as a military attache as needed. This button’s insignia style is often associated with various early 1800’s Official Diplomat buttons. William Leigh noted four other specimens known, a coat and cuff (dug) which was dug in South Carolina  many years back. 1-undug specimen, and mine above found in Vermont. Will do a little more research into Brig. General William Augustas Washington’s Dragoon command structure in South Carolina. A strong link might be warranted to this button. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The Shank is original, straight, and intact. (Double Gilt rm Dates to 1798-Navy examples).

The Robert J. Silverstein Collection
Dug by Jason Lovett in Newfane, V.T. November 15, 2016 

 

 Official Diplomatic Attaché Button OD 3 Sports First Use of Single Arrow & Olive Branch

 

Robert’s Notes: The OD 3 button officially changed the artist style Eagle from a more Heralding Political Diplomat toward a Military Authoritative official when dealing in foreign diplomacy. OD collectors should reasonably assume that other Diplomats would emerge and a similar style eagle will adorn the position to fit the office. I believe this button was intended for someone who would have had an established military viewpoint. I believe OD 3’s aggressive military style button pattern would be the Design origin for the later 1812-15 GI 49 & 50’s series Sheffield Silver Officer buttons. The single arrow symbol represent the diplomatic agent’s authority and influence in decisions concerning War; and the Olive Branch represents that he is an agent of peace as well. The Eagle’s head is properly facing toward the right for peace. Which is a reinforcement of Washington’s Administration foreign policy stance. 

 

 

1802 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Iridescent Gilt.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23.02mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 3: RV 50
Variation: Eagle Facing Right / E. Pluribus Unum / Single Arrow / 5 & 3 Berry Petal Laurel / 16 English Star. 
Present Condition: An Un Dug Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts a New Type of Federal Eagle for Diplomatic Service buttons. The Eagle presents a side view facing right. On the Eagle’s chest is the same type of  Federal Striped Shield that will continue on for the next several decades in OD button shields. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Single Arrow pointing upwards, and to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Short Stem 5 Petal & 3 Berry Olive Branch. Above the Eagle’s head is a flowing banner ribbon with the motto, “E. Pluribus Unum” in Roman font capital letters. The motto means, out of one, many. Circling the outside legend is 16 Six-Pointed Stars. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. EXTRA RICH / ORANGE MOLD LINE.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection

 

 

 

1798’s-1801 U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: Brass Yellow.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Impressed Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23.7mm. Coat Size
Alberts: OD 25 RV 25.
Variation: Federal Style Eagle / Spade Shield W/Small Upright Anchor/ Eleven 6 Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non dug Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional Impression Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is an early 19th Century American Navy Official Diplomat Officers button. From the Double gilt back mark it appears to be British made. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Style Eagle with upraised wings looking to the right. On the eagle’s breast is a Small Upright Anchor with A Roundish Crown. In the eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of Four Arrows. In the eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem Olive Branch with Six Petals. Above the eagle’s head is 11 Six-Pointed Stars. The impressed pattern is struck on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one piece button with a loop shank. The Shank is original, straight, and intact.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

Robert’s notes: OD button Collectors should note: OD 5-A, 25 & 26 A,B,C Variations with Navy Anchors are the earliest known official Federal Naval Diplomat buttons dating to 1798. 

 

 

1812 Official Diplomatic Corps Navy 22.11mm Gilt Copper 17 Stars Albert's OD 5 RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1812 Official Diplomatic Corps Navy 22.11mm Gilt Copper 17 Stars Albert's OD 5 RV 75 No Shank georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1798-1803 (1st in Set of 3 OD 5 Variants) U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: Charcoal Black with Olive Green Pattern Highlights.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 22.11mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 5-A: RV 75
Variation: Federal Shield / Navy Anchor / Long Stem 7 Petal Olive Branch/ 17 Six Pointed Asterisk Type Stars.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: There appears to be several die variants for the OD 5 button. The scarcest one is the Navy attache variant with a small anchor in the center shield. The 5 B & C variants are more easier to find and is depicted with a plain Federal Triple Stripe Shield. This button’s pattern depicts a Spread Wing Eagle facing right. On the Eagle’s chest is a large Federal Shield with a Small Navy Anchor. The anchor symbol usually identified this pattern as belonging to someone who was an official Navy Attaché Diplomat. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of 13 Arrows pointing upwards, and to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem 7 Petal Olive Branch. In a semi-circle just above the eagle’s head is America’s motto, “E. Pluribus Unum” in all capital letters. In the field above the Eagle’s head is 17 Six Pointed Asterisk Type Stars. In 1803, Ohio joined the Federal Union changing it to 17 stars, but collector’s should note that a 17 Star Flag was never an official flag of the United States. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. There is no shank or backmark.

Dug near Albercorn Creek,Lefingham County G.A.
The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

Robert’s notes: OD button Collectors should note: OD 5-A, 25 & 26 A, B, C Variations with Navy Anchors are the earliest known official Federal Naval Diplomat buttons dating to 1798

 

 

Pre-1820 Diplomatic Service 24mm. Alberts OD 5 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com oPre-1820 Diplomatic Service 24mm. Alberts OD 5 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1803-10 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Golden Orange W/ Pockets of Brown Corrosion.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 25mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 5-B: RV 75
Variation: Spread Wing Eagle / Triple Vertical Stripes /  E. Pluribus Unum / 17 Six Pointed Asterisk Type Stars.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the second known die variants for the OD 5 pattern. This button’s pattern depicts a Spread Wing Eagle facing right. On the Eagle’s chest is a large Federal Shield with Triple Vertical Stripes. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of 13 Arrows pointing upwards, and to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a short stem 7 Petal Olive Branch. In a semi-circle just above the eagle’s head is America’s motto, “E. Pluribus Unum” in all capital letters. In the field above the Eagle’s head is 17 Six Pointed Asterisk Type Stars. In 1803, Ohio joined the Federal Union changing it to 17 stars, but collector’s should note that a 17 Star Flag was never an official flag of the United States. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. There is no backmark.

 

 

1820's Diplomat 15mm $2501820's Diplomat 15mm $250 r

1803-05 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Golden Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 15mm. Cuff Size
Albert’s Number: Unlisted Size Variant OD 5-B: RV 100
Variation: Spread Wing Eagle / Federal Stripe Shield / Split Stem 9 Petal olive Branch / 17 Six Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the matching Cuff size variant for OD 5-B. It only depicts 14 Stars and does not have a Banner Ribbon in it’s beak or above. This button’s pattern depicts a Spread Wing Eagle facing right. On the Eagle’s chest is a large Federal Stripe Shield. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of 13 Arrows pointing upwards, and to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a short Split Stem 9 Petal Olive Branch. Five petals on the left branch, and 4 petals on the right branch. In the field above the Eagle’s head is 17 Six Pointed Stars. In 1803, Ohio joined the Federal Union changing it to 17 stars, but collector’s should note that a 17 Star Flag was never an official flag of the United States. Above the stars is a set of Emanating Rays that shoot outward towards the button’s edge. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a replacement eye-loop shank. No backmark.

The Dave Gerber Collection. 

 

 

1798-1803 U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: Brassy Brown With Gilt Pattern Highlights.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 22.5mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 5-C?: RV 150 Alberts PG 497
Variation: Federal Shield / Great Seal Design / Long Stem 8 Petal Olive Branch/ 17 Six Pointed Asterisk Type Stars.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: There appears to be two die variants by 2 manufacturers for the OD 5-C button. This button’s pattern depicts a Spread Wing Eagle facing right. On the Eagle’s chest is a large Federal Shield stripe Shield. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of 13 Arrows pointing upward toward the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem 8 Petal Olive Branch. In a semi-circle just above the eagle’s head is America’s motto, “E. Pluribus Unum” in all capital letters. In the field above the Eagle’s head is 17 Six Pointed Asterisk Type Stars.
Reverse Button Analysis: The shank is missing.

Picture Courteous of Ian Workman.

 

1798-1803 (1st in Set of 3) U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: Charcoal Black with Green Encrustations Gilt Pattern Highlights.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 25mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 5-C: RV 150 Alberts PG 497
Variation: Federal Shield / Great Seal Design / Long Stem 8 Petal Olive Branch/ 17 Six Pointed Asterisk Type Stars.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: There appears to be two Makers with 2 die variants for OD 5-C button. This button’s pattern depicts a Spread Wing Eagle facing right. On the Eagle’s chest is a large Federal Shield. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of 13 Arrows pointing upward toward the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem 8 Petal Olive Branch. In a semi-circle just above the eagle’s head is America’s motto, “E. Pluribus Unum” in all capital letters. In the field above the Eagle’s head is 17 Six Pointed Asterisk Type Stars. In 1803, Ohio joined the Federal Union changing it to 17 stars, but collector’s should note that a 17 Star Flag was never an official flag of the United States. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a wedge shank. There is no shank, backmark “W & R Smith .

A Gift from Robert Milburn
The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

1792-10 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Gilt Brass.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 6-D: RV: 100 PG 497 
Variation: Federal Spread Eagle / 3 Lightening Bolts / 15 Arrows / 15 Five Point Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Strong Design Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button’s pattern depicts the Federal insignia of a Spread Eagle facing towards the right. Over the eagle’s chest is a Large Federal Shield. In the eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of Fifteen Arrows pointing upward toward the left. In it’s right talon is 3 Lightening Bolts. Above the eagle’s is a field of 15 Five Point Stars. Above the field is the Liberty or Phrygian Cap.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. PLATED

  • There is some conjecture about dating this button. I believe that it was first used by an Official Diplomat to George Washington’s 1792 – 1797 Administration. 
  • There is some misconception that this actually was a George Washington Inaugural design.

 

 

 

 

1803-1812 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Golden Brass.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23.63mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 6-A: RV 50
Variation: Spread Wing Eagle / Federal stripe Shield /13 Double Petal Olive Branch / 17 Six Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional Bas-Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This 17 Star Diplomatic Service button is one of the most extravagantly designed buttons in all of the OD series. There is two die variants. One with 13 Stars which has two known backmarks, and one with 17 stars made by Charles Jennens of London. Collectors usually seek the rarer RV 50 Jennen’s 17 Star pattern. The unique design pattern with the Eagle facing toward the Arrows makes me believe the pattern has an ulterior military statement in Support of the foreign war effort between France and Great Britain. Also, this is the only known pattern to have a strong resemblance to the 1789, New Nation Tribute button 15 (GWI 15) made for George Washington’s inauguration. The button’s pattern depicts a variation of the Great Seal of the United States. There is a large Spread Wing Eagle in the center facing right. Over the Eagle’s chest is a Federal Stripe Shield. Flowing over the right and under the left wing is a banner ribbon with the inscription of America’s motto, “E. Pluribus Unum.” In the Eagle’s left talon is a short stem 13 Double Petal Olive Branch. In the Eagle’s right talon is a bundle of 13 Arrows facing upwards, and pointing toward the right. What makes this button unique is the Eagle’s head is facing in the same direction as the arrows!! This can be a symbol of support for a pro-war official diplomat who was in support of supporting the French War against the British in Europe. Above the Eagle’s head is 17 Six Pointed Stars. In 1803, Ohio joined the Federal Union changing it to 17 stars, but collector’s should note that a 17 Star Flag was never an official flag of the United States. Above the Stars is 6 Swirling Clouds. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. 

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

1803-20’s U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Coppery Brown With Gilt Remnants. 
Metal: Flat: 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 24.48mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 07: RV:45
Variation: Federal Eagle / Down Swept Wings / 3 Multi-Directional Arrows / 13 Petal 6 Berry Olive Branch.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button is similar to Albert’s example, but the backmark differs and hosts 13 stars with a floral pattern instead of 16 stars, and the word, “plated.” The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Eagle facing right with Down Swept Wings. In the Eagle’s right talon is Three Multi-directional Arrows pointing upwards. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Long Stem 13 Petal Olive Branch with 6 Berries. Circling around the legend is 17 Six-Pointed Stars. In 1803, Ohio joined the Federal Union changing it to 17 stars, but collector’s should note that a 17 Star Flag was never an official flag of the United States. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. R/M Floral Pattern above and Treble Gilt / Floral Design / inner ring of 13 stars circling within.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

 

1816 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Bright Yellow Brass.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 24.65mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 08: RV: 35
Variation: Federal Eagle / Down Swept Wings / Three Multi-directional Arrows / Olive Branch
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Eagle facing left with Down Swept Wings. In the Eagle’s left talon is Three Multi-directional Arrows. Two arrows are pointing toward the bottom, and one arrow is pointing upwards toward the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem 11 Petal Olive Branch. Circling around the legend is 17 Six-Pointed Stars. In 1803, Ohio joined the Federal Union changing it to 17 stars, but collector’s should note that a 17 Star Flag was never an official flag of the United States. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. Treble Gilt dm with 3 stars.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection. 

 

 

 

 

 

1824-35 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Golden Brass.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 24.07mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 9: RV: 35
Variation: Federal Droop Wing Eagle / 3 Thin Shaft Arrows / 6 Petal Olive Branch / 17 Six Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button’s pattern depicts a Federal Droop Wing Eagle facing towards the right. Over the eagle’s chest is simple design of a Federal Shield. In the eagle’s left talon is a Small Bundle of Three Thin Shaft Arrows pointing downward toward the left. In it’s right talon is a Six Large Petal Olive Branch.  Above the eagle’s head is a thin banner ribbon with the raised inscription, “E PLURIBUS UNUM” which is Latin for out of many one. Circling around the outside legend is 17 Six Pointed Stars. The high relief pattern is set on an evenly lined field with a plain raised edge border .
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

1824-35 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Gilt Brass.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 15.11mm. Cuff Size.
Albert’s: OD 9v: RV: 50
Variation: Federal Droop Wing Eagle / Small Bundle 3 Arrows / 5 Petal Olive Branch / 24 Six Point Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button’s pattern depicts a Federal Droop Wing Eagle facing towards the right. Slightly slanted over the eagle’s chest is a Federal Lined Shield. In the eagle’s left talon is a Small Bundle of Three Arrows pointing toward the left. In it’s right talon is a short stem 5 Petal Olive Branch. Above the eagle’s head is a banner with the raised inscription, “E PLURIBUS UNUM” which is Latin for out of one many. Circling around the outside legend is 24 Six Pointed Stars. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. 

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

1810-24 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Brass Yellow.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 21.82mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 10: RV: 50
Variation: Federal Eagle / Down Swept Wings / 3 Multi-directional Arrows / 10 Petal Olive Branch. 
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This OD’s button’s pattern depicts a Federal Eagle facing right with Down Swept Wings. In the Eagle’s right talon is Three Multi-directional Arrows. The middle arrow is facing towards the right, and the other arrows are facing towards the left. In it’s left talon is a long stem 11 Petal and Two Berry Olive Branch. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. A.M PEASLEY. * / ** BOSTON

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

 

 

1808-1817 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Reflective Gold.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 11: RV 40
Variation: Flying Federal Eagle / Closed Laurel Crown / Flames With Forked Lightening.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High-Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: Armitage’s buttons were made with sheffield silver and in gilt brass. John Earl button was only made in gilt brass. There are two patterns with three very subtle difference. First, is the top lightening bolt length and placement on the button. Next is in Armitage’s button pattern. It shows the Eagle’s right wing just touching the button’s edge. Last difference is in the laurel crown. Armitage’s pattern shows a closed wreath, and in Earl’s pattern the wreath is open by eagle’s talon. This button’s pattern depicts a Flying Federal Eagle looking downward. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Closed Laurel Crown. Emerging from the Eagle’s right talon is Flames with Forked Lightening. The top lightening bolt is longer and facing sideways. This could be a reference relating to ancient Greek mythology. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. the shank is original, straight, and intact. RM Armitage/Phila Best

The Robert J. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

Pre-1820's Diplomatic Service 24mm sheffield Silver. Albert's O11A no shank. georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R1817 Official & Diplomatic Service 23.06mm Silvered Brass Albert's OD 11 RV 40+ 2

1808-1817 U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Silvery Greenish-Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Sheffield Silver.
Size: 23.06mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 11-A: RV 50
Variation:Flying Federal Eagle / Closed Laurel Crown / Flames With Forked Lightening.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Fair Planchet Condition, A Good High-Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is Armitage’s Sheffield Silver Variant. This example can be found in the back of Albert’s book on page 499, not the one on page 297. This button’s pattern depicts a Flying Federal Eagle looking downward. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Closed Laurel Crown. Emerging from the Eagle’s right talon is Flames with Forked Lightening. The Top Lightening Bolt is longer and facing sideways. This could be a reference relating to ancient Greek mythology. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is missing & no backmark.

Debra the buttons are brass , the eagle with wreath button has two back marks can’t make out original b/m but the top b/m is armitage in Albert’s he tells that in 1817 these buttons were to be reused thus the armitage b/m re-strike button was probably old stock that never got silver plated thus could be as early as 1808 with the Armitage re-strike but that is just my opinion. The other button has a Fullerton & Gragin b/m have not been able to find this button in any books though it does have the look of a OD button tice list this back mark as sometime in the first to third part of 1800. J Baldwin.~

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

1808 Official Diplomate OD 11 RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1808 Official Diplomate OD 11 RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

 

Pre-1820’s U.S. Official & Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Deep Gilded Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 11:     RV 40
Variation: Flying Federal Eagle / Open Laurel Crown / .
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: Isabela’s Notes: This is John Earl’s die variant. There are patterns made for this button. There are three subtle difference in the variants. First, is the top lightening bolt placement. Second, is Earl’s Eagle’s right wing is shorter and set back from the button’s edge. Third, the Laurel Crown design is slightly different. Armitage’s Wreath is Closed, and Earl’s is Open by eagle’s talon. This button’s pattern depicts a Flying Federal Eagle looking downward. In the Eagle’s left talon is an Open Laurel Crown. Emerging from the Eagle’s right talon is Flames with Forked Lightening. In this button’s pattern the Top Lightening Bolt is Shorter and facing upward. This could be a reference relating to ancient Greek mythology. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field with a plain edge.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. RM John Earl / New York within a channel of 4 raised marker rings. 

Picture Courteous of William Leigh.

 

 

 

1810-20’s U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button?

Color: A Coppery Brass.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Silvered Copper.
Size: 25mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: GI 51
Variation: Federal Eagle / Three Arrows / 4 Petal Olive Branch / 12 American 5 Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: I cannot be certain this button was ever used for Official diplomates. The pattern is similar to both OD 7 & OD 9, but there is 12 Stars instead of 13, 16, 17. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Eagle looking upward and to the right. The eagle has a straight upward neck that is reminiscent to some early 1812 Artillery buttons. In the Eagle’s left talon is Three Arrows. Two are pointing upward to the left, and one is pointing downward to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a very short horizontal 4 Petal Olive Branch. Circling in the legend is 12 American Five Pointed Stars. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. Over struck backmark FULLERTON & CKAGIN * /BOSTON within a double dm ring

The J. Baldwin Collection. 

 

1816-1820 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Gilt Brass Yellow with Copper Initial Highlights.
Metal: Slightly Convex, 1-Piece Gilt Brass.
Size: 20mm. Coat Size.
Albert‘s: OD 15: RV 15
Variation: 
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen?, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts the old english initials USA. The high relief pattern is set on an evenly lined field with a plain raised edge. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece slightly concave button with a re-shank loop. The shank is not inherent, but straight and intact.

Robert’s Notes: Hammond Turner & Sons was established under that name in 1816 (based upon my DOCUMENTED research, old dates are 1823 to at least 1865, but my new and correct dates for H T & S are 1816 to at least 1867, Based upon the construction, and the fact that I have not seen that Crown type after 1820, I would date this buttons 1816-1820.  If it has an A-Shank it would be before 1818.

Picture Courteous of Ian Workman.

 

 

 

1807-1825 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Gilt Brass Yellow with Copper Touch Marks.
Metal: Slightly Convex, 1-Piece Gilt Copper.
Size: 22.06mm. Coat Size.
Albert‘s:OD 16: RV 15
Variation: No backmark.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts the old english initials A over US. The high relief pattern is set on an evenly lined field with a plain raised edge. The most common ones are with blank backmarks. It was noted by Gary Embrey they were all made by Jennings in England.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece concave button with a Copper loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

1826-43 US Official Diplomatic Service Albert OD 17 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1826-43 US Official Diplomatic Service Albert OD 17 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1852 to 1872 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Golden Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece Gilded Brass.
Size: 25mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s OD 17: RV 20
Variation: Arrow Tips Above Wing / Two Small Stipples / Slender Eagles Neck.
Present Condition: An Excavated Example, Strong Planchet Condition, Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button’s pattern has three known die variants. There is a slight variations in the depiction of the Eagle, the arrow tips over or under the wing, and the raised stipples placed in-between the initials. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Spread Wing Eagle facing right. In this die variant, the Eagle’s neck is less detailed, a little more slender and longer. In it’s left talon is a small Bundle of Three Arrows. In this die variant, all the Arrow Tips are Above the eagle’s left wing. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Five Petal Olive Branch. There is 13 Five-Pointed Stars in a semicircle above the Eagle’s head, and the Old English Initials, “USA” below. This button has Two Raised Small Stipples placed in-between each of the initials. The high relief pattern is set on an evenly lined convex field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. G & W BOGGETT & CO. / . ST MARTINS LANE . / LONDON” dm middle solid line, this maker operated from 1826 to 1843 at this address, (Boggett01).

The Harry Ridgeway Collection. 

 

 

 

 

1800-20 US official Diplomat OD 17 Unlisted Variant Georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1800-20 US official Diplomat OD 17 Unlisted Variant Georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1841-52 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Antique Brass.
Metal: Convex, 2-Piece, Gilt Brass.
Size: 22.44mm. Coat Size.
Similar to Albert’s:OD 17: RV 25
Variation: Two Arrow Tips Below Wings / Two Large Stipples / Fuller Feathered Eagle’s Neck.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, Exceptional Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This die variant is not listed in Albert’s Book. The button’s pattern has three known die variants. There is a slight variation in the depiction of the Eagle, the arrow tips over or under the wing, and the raised stipples in-between the initials. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Spread Wing Eagle facing right. In this die variant the Eagle’s neck is more detailed with feathers. In it’s left talon is a small Bundle of Three Arrows. In this maker’s die variant, the Two of the Arrow Tips are below the eagle’s left wing. In the Eagle’s right Talon is a Five Petal Olive Branch. In a semi-circle above the Eagle’s head is 13 Five-Pointed Stars. In the legend below is the Old English Initials, “USA” for United States of America. There is Two Large Raised Stipples in-between each letter of the U S initials. The high relief pattern is set on an evenly lined convex field. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. P & S FERMIN / 153 STRAND / LONDON 2OUTER STIPPLE RING INNER INCUSE RING.

The RJ Silverstein Collection. 

 

 

 

1850-60's Official Diplotatic Service 22.99 Gilt Brass 2-Piece W: Cut-out Applied Device Albert's OD 18 RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com B1850-60's Official Diplotatic Service 22.99 Gilt Brass 2-Piece W: Cut-out Applied Device Albert's OD 18 RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com RB

1840-52 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button – Minister?

Color: Tarnished Brass Yellow.
Metal: Convex, 2-Piece W/ Cut Out Device, Gilt Brass.
Size: 22.99mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s OD 18: Unlisted French Backmark RV 100  / Both Firmin’s Backmark RV 50
Variation: Federal Eagle / Three Arrows / Four Petal Olive Branch / 26 American Five Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: There appears to be two English and one French die variant to this unique cut-out pattern. The first pattern by Firmin has Thirteen 5-pointed American stars in the band. The second pattern by Firmin has 26 five-pointed stars in the band. The third pattern is by French manufacturers and the pattern has 26 Five-Pointed Stars in the band. This Official Diplomatic Service button has three known backmarks. The earliest backmark is “P & S Firmin/153/Strand/London. This was made under the partnership of Phillip and Samuel. This button can date as early as 1840 to as late as 1852. This particular OD pattern was labeled, “Minister” in Firmin’s Sample Book. The second backmark: Firmin & Sons/153 Strand/London is a later backmark after Samuels (1852). This style backmark seems to continue on to around 1872 (Not the Button).  The third backmark is of French manufacturing, and also dates from the early 1840’s to the early 1850’s. The French pattern does slightly differ from the English pattern. For collector’s notes, the French maker Cordier and Cie is listed, they became Gourdin & Cie. I don’t see anything referenced to “B” although I imagine this is a “related party.” 23M/Paris* C & B * / Stamped logo design. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Spread Wing Eagle facing right. In it’s left talon is a Bundle of Three Arrows. One arrow points directly up under the Eagle’s left wing, and the other two arrows are evenly spaced pointing toward the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Four Petal Olive Branch which covers over the eagle’s Tail Feathers. Circling around the eagle is a Stippled Band with 26 American Five-Pointed Stars. Collectors should note, in the French pattern the Eagle’s Wing Tips “do not protrude” outside the band. It appears the band on the Firmin’s pattern is smaller and much closer to the eagle’s body. This allows the wing tips to protrude on the other side of the band. As part of the cut out device, in the legend below is the Old English Initials, “USA” for United States of America. The cut out device is set on a plain gilt convex field. I believe these cut out device buttons by either maker is extremely rare to find in the market, and collectors of Official Diplomatic Service buttons should take any opportunity to obtain OD 18 without hesitation of price.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a two-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. 23M/Paris* C & B * / Stamped logo design.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

*Collectors should note, the later Firmin’s & Sons backmark are also found on the ultra high quality Confederate Navy buttons that were produced for the south during the Civil War.

 

 

Official & Diplomatic Button OD 19 RV 35 22.5mm no shank Dug at old pasture Long Island NY RJ Silversteins Georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O

1820’s U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Silvery Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Silver or Tinned Copper.
Size: 22.5mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 19 RV 35
Variation: 13 Star Arced Above, Profile Spread Eagle,
Present Condition: An Excavated Example, Fair Planchet Condition, Good Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button’s pattern depicts a Right Side profile of a Spread Wing Eagle. In it’s left talon is a Bundle of Nine Arrows pointing upward. In it’s right is an Olive Branch with 9 Petals. There is 13 Five-Pointed Stars arced above the Eagle’s head, and “United States of America” inscribed below. The high relief pattern is set on a plain field with no edge border.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is reportedly missing.

Dug off Jennings Road Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.
The Mathew V. Collection. 

 

*******       *******       *******

1840-43 United States Official Diplomatic Attaché Uniform

The Robert J. Silverstein Stewardship, awarded by Lt. Col. Robert & Elizabeth Milburn. 

This man has such a beautiful soul, it touches me so true. I bless Bob and Elizabeth, and I rejoice for them wanting to live like General Cincinnati, and my Heart only wishes I could!

*******      *******

*******

In this early 1840-43 American Craftsmanship Era, All Diplomatic Service Uniforms were Specially Made for Officials that wore them. The tailor would custom measure, craft the fabric from bolts, design & hand-stitch every single inch including medal embroidery collars, and sleeve cuffs.This uniform is more then special, for the OD 22 Buttons are One-Piece Dome obverse and convex reverse. Not, the 2-piece French later supplied as replacements. Laying my hand on the fabric and feeling the Era is a wonderful experience I wish I can share.

 

 

 

1860's Official Diplotatic Service 24.29 Gilt Brass 2-Piece Albert's OD 20 RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1860's Official Diplotatic Service 24.29 Gilt Brass 2-Piece Albert's OD 20 RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1840-43 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button
Not off the 1840-43 Uniform Above, those are plain B/M

Color: Brass Yellow W/ Copper Undertone.
Metal: Slightly Convex, 1-Piece, Gilt Brass.
Size: 24.29mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 20 RV 35 Superfin/A Paris B/M RV 25
Variation:  Federal Eagle / Bundle 5 Arrows / 5 Petals / 13 Stripes / E Pluribus Unum / 13 Six Point Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This Official Diplomatic Service button only has one pattern known, but can have two different backmarks. Albert took note to a Superfin/A Paris rm backmark. This button’s pattern depicts a Federal Eagle facing right. In it’s left talon is a small Bundle of Five Arrows pointing downward. In it’s right is a short stem Olive Branch with 5 Petals. There is a Federal  Shield with 13 Stripes on the Eagle’s chest. Above the eagle is a Banner Ribbon with the U.S. motto, “E Pluribus Unum” in high relief. There are 13 Six-Point Stars in the field behind and above the eagle’s head. The high relief pattern is set on an evenly lined field that is within a picture frame beveled flat border. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece slightly concave button with a copper loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. PERFECTION / PARIS * L.

The Robert J. Silverstein Collection.

* Collector’s note: This example dates between 1840 – 1843. This is the same B/M as the Republic of Texas Consular button wore by Honri Castro. The “L” is for – Fabrique de Emile Larrivee, 2 ruedes petits-champs. Voir aussie Perfectionnee 1836 – 1885 in Paris

 

 

 

1800's Official Diplomat Service 17.99mm Gilt Brass Albert's OD 22 Unlisted BM RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1800's Official Diplomat Service 17.99mm Gilt Brass Albert's OD 22 Unlisted BM RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

Late 1800’s U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: Yellow Highlight Antique Brass.
Metal: Flat, 2-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 17.99mm. Cuff Size.
Albert’s: OD 22Av: Unlisted Size Variant & B/M  RV 50
Variation: Ribbon in Beek / E Pluribus Unum in Raised Capital Letters / 13 Five Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: There appears to be 2 manufacturers for this button. Both buttons differ in it’s depiction in several way. This button’s pattern depicts a variation of the Great Seal of the United States. In the center is a Federal Eagle facing right with one-end of a Banner Ribbon in his beak. In the banner ribbon is the US Motto, “E Pluribus Unum” in all raised capital letters. In the field behind the Eagle’s head is 13 Five-Pointed Stars. In the Eagle’s left talon is 3 Lightening Bolts with Arrow Tips. This idea comes from Greek mythology relating to Zeus or even Neptune’s Trident. 1812-18 Officer’s Infantry buttons also sported this idea. There is a Federal Type Spade Shaped Shield on the eagle’s chest. There is a plain field in the top portion of the shield, and 13 Stripes in lower half. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem Olive Branch with Six Petals and Three Berries.  The high relief pattern is on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a two-piece button with a copper loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. SUPERIENR * 3 PETAL CLOVE * INCUSE STIPPLE RING.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

1820 Diplomatic Ateche OD-22 rj silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbutoons.com O1820 Diplomatic Ateche OD-22 rj silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbutoons.com R

Last quarter of 19th Century U.S. Officials Diplomatic Service Button

Color: An Antique Brass.
Metal: Flat, 2-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 27mm. Larger Coat Size
Albert’s: OD 22: RV 25
Variation: Ribbon in Beek / E Pluribus Unum / 13 Six Pointed Stars / 3 Lightening Bolts W/ Arrow Tips. 
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The K.u.K Hof/Liebferanten is Austrio/German and is most likely out of Vienna, Austria. The Button would have been made in Germany, and it’s construction is indicative of just that. The spiral radius design around the shank is a dead give a way to similar country buttons. Also, collectors should note the coat of arms as well. Most likely the button was for a Diplomat for that country. So, to keep it simple, I believe this backmark to be German, and would date the serving official to the last quarter of 19th Century. (Just having a tough time tightly dating). This button’s pattern depicts a variation of the Great Seal of the United States. In the center is a Federal Eagle facing right with one-end of a Banner Ribbon in his beak. In the banner ribbon is the US Motto, “E Pluribus Unum” in all capital letters. In the field behind the Eagle’s head is 13 Six-Pointed Stars. In the Eagle’s left talon is 3 Lightening Bolts with Arrow Tips. This idea comes from Greek mythology relating to Zeus or even Neptune’s Trident. 1812-18 Officer’s Infantry buttons also sported this idea. There is a Federal Type Spade Shaped Shield on the eagle’s chest. There is a plain field in the top portion of the shield, and 13 Stripes in lower half. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem Olive Branch with Eight Petals and 3 Berries. The high relief pattern is on a plain flat field. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a two-piece button with a copper loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. KuK Hof /Lieferanten B S W Coat of Arms.

Picture Courteous of Bill Henderson.

Robert, I was looking at your wondrous and Informative Diplomatic Button Pages.  I noticed the button OD-22, which was made in Vienna Austro-Hungarian Empire, BSW in a Trefoil.  Some years back I picked up a collections of buttons and a military buttons with that backmark was included, it was so interesting that I researched it.  I may be able to tighten up the dating on that button for you.  See the attached info page I worked up on the backmark.  I do pages like this for all of the OPMG backmarks as well. – Bob

Diplomatic button BSW/ K.u.K Hof Lieferanten (1885-1918), BROTHERS SCHNEIDER WEIN, Royal & Imperial Button Purveyors, Vienna

The Designation of KuK (Kaiserlicher und Königlicher), Imperial & Royal, Hoflieferanten (Supplier) was granted to those merchants who had a special permit by Imperial Privilege to be a Royal Purveyor of goods for the Austro-Hungarian Dual Monarchy. Note the Use of the emblem of the Austro-Hungarian Empire which was allowed by the permit.

The firm initials BSW in a trefoil represents the firm of the Brothers Schneider of Wein (BSW). At that time, Wein was the Capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.  

The Trademark BSW within a Trefoil, was Registered as Trademark Nr. 3933, 21 January 1885. The Double-headed Eagle of the Austro-Hungarian Empire was not used after 1918 as the empire was dissolved.

*

*******       *******       *******

 

William Watkins, London Tailor, Tailor to then Minister, and later President Van Buren.

*******       *******

     I would like to take a moment and thank Robert Milburn once again for contributing. This one definitely gets a 3 Gun Salute. This bill head should be seen as a window into the everyday workings of an official tailor’s order form from the America Ministers and Attaches, Diplomatic Uniforms. This shows how there was an official way and means in the 19th century for politicians and military officers to obtain their custom made uniforms. 

     In this era, custom reputable tailors were highly cherished in society. Many tailors had relationships with their clients which lasted decades. The document in the link below is from the Manuscript Division. It provides insights which clearly shows how officers cherished reputable known tailors of the era. Even President Van Buren shows in his writings, his  friendly relationship with his tailor which carried through his administrations, and possibly well after as he hints.

     It appears to me that still many years after the American Revolution, London still provided a lot of American Officers with the best garments and uniforms of the time. Just as we have brand recognition today, in the 19th century the high quality of the garment was noted and cherished by sophisticated men of means from London.

*******

Robert Watkins, on Mount St., possibly related in a list of Merchant Tailors of London dated 1799.

1841- Watkins William, tailor, 6 Goodge st. Tottenham Court Road

1843- Watkins Wm. tailor, 7 Little Argyle street, Regent street, pg 420, London Post Office directory

1852 – Watkins Wm. tailor, 7 Little Argyll street, Regent street, pg 1050, London Post Office Directory

Calendar of the papers of Martin Van Buren: 

https://books.google.com/books?id=WEMFAAAAYAAJ

Library of Congress. Manuscript Division, ‎Elizabeth Howard West – 1910 – ‎Read – ‎More editions

Smith Van Buren’s engagement to Henrietta Irving; the Erie Railroad; advice as to medical treatment; the Arctic; directions for mail; message to Watkins a tailor in regard to “U.S. Official Diplomatic uniforms”; etc. A. L. S. 1 p. 1854 Van Buren, Martin. Nice. To Martin Van Buren, Jr., Nov. l London. Plans for his itinerary; the Doctor’s fees; the climate at Nice; American tourists; the Arctic; diplomatic uniform; order for Mr. Wat- kins, Van Buren’s London tailor; directions and advice; etc. A. L. S. 3 p.

*******       *******       *******

 

 

 

1852-70 Official Diplotatic Service 20.89 Gilt Brass RJ Silverstein georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1852-70 Official Diplotatic Service 20.89 Gilt Brass RJ Silverstein georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1852-70 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Secretary to American Legation at the Court of Napoleon III

Color: Antique Brass.
Metal: Convex, 2-Piece W/ Cut Out Applied Device, Gilt Brass.
Size: 20.89mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 23 RV 25
Variation: Federal Eagle / 13 Stripe Shield / 15 Five-Pointed American Stars / Bundle of 6 Arrows.  
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: There are two known patterns for this Diplomatic Service button. Both are produced by French manufacturers. There appears to be a slight difference in the depiction of the eagle, and the number of arrows and branch petals depicted. In Albert’s book, this button was labeled, “Secretary to American Legation at the Court of Napoleon III.” So this information along with the backmark helps us date the button, and it’s specific use. The button’s pattern depicts a variation of the Great Seal of the United States. The button’s has an applied cut-out device of a Federal Eagle facing right. On the eagle’s chest is a large Federal 13 Stripe Shield. Above the eagle’s head is an arc is a band with 15 Five Pointed American Stars. In the Eagle’s left talon is a small Bundle of 6 Arrows. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Short Stem Olive Branch with 9 or 10 petals. This cut-out design is set on a plain convex field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a two-piece button with a raised pedestal copper loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. 20 With-in a Design / Paris / Crest / G. Cie..

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

OD 23 21mm G & Cie ParisOD 23 21mm G & Cie Paris 2

1852-70 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Secretary to American Legation at the Court of Napoleon III

Color: A Tarnished Silver.
Metal: High-Convex, 2-Piece W/ A Cut-Out Applied Device, Silver’d.
Size: 21mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 23: Unlisted Backmark : RV 15
Variation: Federal Eagle / Thirteen Arrows / Federal Stripe Shield / Short Stem 4 Petal Olive Branch.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes:  This is the second known pattern for this Diplomatic Service button. This pattern variation is not listed in Albert’s book, but the other pattern was labeled, “Secretary to American Legation at the Court of Napoleon III.” So, this along with the backmark helps us date the button, and it’s specific intended use. The button’s pattern depicts a variation of the Great Seal of the United States. The button’s pattern shows an applied cut-out device of a Federal Eagle facing right. On the eagle’s chest is a large Federal 13 Stripe Shield. Above the eagle’s head is an arc is a band with 15 Five Pointed American Stars. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of 13 Arrows. In the Eagle’s right talon is a Short Stem Olive Branch with 4 petals. The cut-out design is set on a plain convex field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a two-piece flat back button with a copper loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. SUPER FINE /E/B/PARIS within 2 concentric dm rings.

 

 

 

1830’s-40’s U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: An Antique Brass.
Metal: Low-Convex, 2-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 21mm.
Albert’s: OD 24: RV 10
Variation: Federal Eagle / Federal Shield / 3 Arrows / Olive Branch / 13 Six Pointed Stars / Circle of 10 Clouds.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the first button in the series that closely reflects the actual Great Seal of the United States. Robinson made these buttons in the early 1830’s through the 40’s for official diplomats. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Eagle in the center facing right. There is a Banner Ribbon in the Eagle’s beak with the US Motto, “E Pluribus Unum” in all capital letters. On the eagle’s chest is a Federal Shield with stripes in the upper and lower half. In the eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of Three Arrows facing upwards to the left. In the eagle’s right talon is a short stem Olive Branch with Seven Petals and Three Berries. Above the eagle’s head is 13 Six Pointed Stars within a Circle of Ten Clouds. The high relief pattern is set on a low convex evenly lined field with a thin raised edge. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. R & W ROBINSON within a dm Banner Ribbon / Eagle in top legend. ca 1830’s 1840’s, Robinson 610.

Picture Courteous of the Bill Henderson.  

 

 

 

1800's Official Diplomat 23.5mm Silvered Joe Cuervas OD 26 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O 1800's Official Diplomat 23.5mm Silvered Joe Cuervas OD 26 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1798’s-1801 U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: Flashcube Silver.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Impressed Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23.5mm. Coat Size
Alberts: OD 25 RV 25.
Variation: Federal Style Eagle / Spade Shield W/Small Upright Anchor/ Eleven 6 Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional Impression Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is an early 19th Century American Navy Official Diplomat Officers button. From the back mark it appears English made. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Style Eagle with upraised wings looking to the right. On the eagle’s breast is a Small Upright Anchor with A Roundish Crown. In the eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of Four Arrows. In the eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem Olive Branch with Six Petals. Above the eagle’s head is 11 Six-Pointed Stars. The impressed pattern is struck on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one piece button with a loop shank. The Shank is original, straight, and intact.

The Joe Cuevas Collection.

 

 

Sililar to OD 25 15mm Cuff Gilt Brass RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com OSililar to OD 25 15mm Cuff Gilt Brass RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1798-1801 U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: A Golden Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Impressed Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 15mm. Cuff Size.
Alberts: OD 25-Av: Unlisted Variant RV 35.
Variation: Federal Style Eagle / Federal Striped Shield/ Bundle of Three Arrows / Five 6 Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional Impression Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the matching cuff button to OD 25. Albert does list another cuff variant with 9 stars with a blank backmark. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Style Eagle with upraised wings looking to the right. On the eagle’s breast is a Small Federal Striped Shield. In the eagle’s left talon is a Bundle of Three Arrows. In the eagle’s right talon is a Long Stem Olive Branch with Six Petals. Above the eagle’s head is 5 Six-Pointed Stars. The impressed pattern is struck on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one piece button with a loop shank. The Shank is original, straight, and intact. DOUBLE GILT / Wreath * Wreath dm.

 

 

 

1798-1801 U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: Brown W A Green Undertone
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 20.5mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 26-A RV 35
Variation: Federal Eagle / Spade Shield / Oval Shield W/ Fouled Anchor / Sun Burst Ray Pattern / 16 Six Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Fair Planchet Condition, A Fair Raised Design Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: Albert noted in his book that there are two pattern variations, but with metal detector finds, I was able to document a 3rd, and believe there might have been a fourth in Long Island, N.Y.. These crude style designs appear to be early Federal Eagle design renditions that were used to represent Federal Diplomat Navy Offices. OD button Collectors should note OD 5-A, 25 & 26 Variations with Navy Anchors to Appreciate the importance of earliest known official Federal Naval Diplomat buttons. Most likely, the style button was chosen when the Official Diplomat ordered his garment.

     This button’s pattern depicts a crude style Federal Eagle facing right with small narrow upraised wings. On the eagle’s breast is a slightly slanted Spade Shape Lined Shield. Covering over the eagles left wing is a slightly slanted large Oval lined Shield with a Fouled Anchor.  The cable comes off the r-h-s of the Anchor’s upright top ring. The rope goes under the stock and over the shaft, and then under the left fluke where swings under the crown and points toward the right. In the eagles left talon is a bundle of Seven Arrows pointing upward, and to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a short stem Seven Petal Olive Branch.  Above the eagle’s head in raised letters is the U.S. motto, “E Pluribus Unum.” In the field above is a Sunburst Ray Pattern emanating upward between the eagle’s wings. Circling around the button’s outer edge is 16 Six-Pointed Raised Stars. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is re-shanked by some idiot to give value.

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

Robert’s Notes: From a crude obverse engraving, and reverse construction perspective, I would say OD 26-A & C was made in America, and OD 26-B in England. The refinement of the symbols in the insignia of 26-B demonstrate superior English artisanship. As to which came first, i’ll let you have fun and figure it out. Being equal that all artisans had insignia symbols since 1789.

 

1790-1800 OD 26-B 22mm Gilt Brass RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1790-1800 OD 26-B 22mm Gilt Brass RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1798-1801 U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: A Charcoal Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 26-B RV 35
Variation: Federal Eagle / Oval Shield / 7 Arrows / Ray Pattern / 17 Six Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Fair Planchet Condition, A Fair Impression Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: Albert notes two pattern variations in his book, but I believe there might have been three or four. Even though all three known patterns have distinct difference in the pattern’s characteristics, I think collector’s should emphasis the change from 16 to 17 stars. Also, this is one of the earliest known Federal Navy Diplomat buttons. This button’s pattern depicts a Federal Eagle facing right with a small vertical Oval Shield under it’s left wing. Within the shield is a Small Fouled Anchor with a cable coming off the r-h-s of the Anchor’s upright top ring. The rope goes over the stock and shaft, and then under the left fluke where swings under the crown and points toward the right. In the eagles left talon is a bundle of Seven Multi-Directional Arrows pointing upward, and to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a short stem Six Petal Olive Branch. On the eagle’s chest is a Federal Type Stripe Shield. Above the eagle’s head is the U.S. motto, “E Pluribus Unum” in high relief. In the field above is a Multi-Ray Pattern emanating upward between the eagle’s wings. Circling around the button’s outer edge is 17 Six-Pointed Stars. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. (Floral Design) J.P.(Floral design) LONDON within a raised stipple ring.

Robert, you have another  button OD-26B, 1801-1805, Backmark “J.P.” that button was made by John Pitter, London.  McGuinn & Bazelon pg. 55 has the “J.P.” backmark listed as James Pitt ca 1790-1805, this is an error possibly and mistake between Pitt and Pitter.  Somehow they might have gotten partial information, there was no James Pitt, there was a Charles Pitt.  The person most likely to have had the button made for him or to have made the button was James Pitter, he was listed in the London Directories as first  J. Pitter 1800, and then James Pitter 1801-1805 was a “Gold Laceman”, a trade card I viewed for the firm of Pitter & Fox (1806-1826, Covent Garden) , Gold & Silver Lacemen & Embroiderers to his Majesty, & Their Royal Highnesses, the Duke of Cumberland, Sussex, Cambridge & Gloucester. (it is copyrighted so could not copy the image) states that they deal in Regimental & Naval Laces, Epaulets, Swords & Sabers, Sword Knots, Belts, Belt Plates, Gorgets, Sashes & Etc.     

John Pitter  and Benjamin Fox were in partnership between 1808 and 1826, the same year they were appointed Gold Lacemen in Ordinary to George IV. For more information see Leslie Southwick, London Silver-hilted Swords…, 2001, p. 197 -Lt. Col. Robert Milburn

 

 

 

OFFICIAL DIPLOMAT

1797-1801 U.S. Official Diplomatic Attaché to the Navy Department

Color: A Seaweed Green With Reddish-Brown Edges.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Impressed Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s Number: OD 26-C Unlisted Transition Pattern: RV 50
Variation: Federal Eagle / Oval Shield / Small Fouled Anchor / Ray Pattern / 16 Six Pointed Stars.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong Impression Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: I believe this button is a transitional button between OD 25 and OD 26. Most likely made before Albert’s OD 26-A. Collectors should note two distinctive traits. First, is the transition between OD 25’s impressed pattern to OD 26 high relief pattern. Second, this button clearly shows all of OD 26’s pattern traits along with sharing OD 26-A trait of 16 stars, but not and OD 26-B trait of 17 Stars. This transitional button depicts a Federal Eagle facing right with a small vertical Oval Shield under it’s left wing. Within the shield is a Small Fouled Anchor with a rope coming off the r-h-s of the Anchor’s upright top ring. The rope goes under the stock, shaft, and left fluke where it dangles below the crown. In the eagles left talon is a small bundle of  Three Multi-Directional Arrows pointing upward, and to the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is a short stem 5 Petal Olive Branch. There is a Sun Ray Pattern emanating upward from behind the Eagle. There are 16 Six Pointed Stars circling around the outside legend. The impressed pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is reportedly original, straight, and intact.

 

 

 

1800-20 Official Diplomat Albert's OD 27 RV 75 Orig. Shank RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1800-20’s U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button (Scottish Variant)

Color: A Reflective Glass Bluish-Grey.
Metal: Flat, 2-Piece, Raised Design, Silver Plated.
Size: 34.13mm. Large Cloak, Cape, or Jacket Size.
Albert’s: OD 27: RV 75
Variation: Federal Eagle-Pheonix / 5 Scottish Thistles / 5 Petal Olive Branch / Fleur de Lis Tail Feathers.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button depicts one of the original designs put forth for the Federal Eagle by the Scottish-Rite Artisans in Philadelphia. This eagle is one of the designs the Scottish-Rite Masons offered during the federal government’s pursuit to adopt new official insignias. The button’s pattern depicts a Phoenix-Type Spread Wing Eagle facing right. There is a Thirteen Stripe Federal Shield over the Eagle’s chest. In the Eagle’s left talon is a Small Bundle of 5 Scottish Thistles. In the Eagle’s right talon is a short stem 5 Petal Olive Branch. Above the Eagle’s head is 13 Five Pointed American Stars. In this depiction, the Eagle has Long Tail Feathers that can represent an upside down French Fleur de Lis. One can easily theorize the artisan added a multi layered allusion which incorporates Scottish and French tribute. Collectors should note the Scottish-Rite &  Bonnie Prince tribute to the number 5. The French are allies during the Glorious Revolution and supported the Patriots during the American revolution. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field with no raised edge border. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat two-piece button with a copper loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact.

The Robert J. Silverstein Collection. 

 

 

 

1853-63 U.S. Official Diplomat 25mm Gilt Brass OD 233 : OD 33 Non Dug Orig Shank O1853-63 U.S. Official Diplomat 25mm Gilt Brass OD 233 : OD 33 Non Dug Orig Shank R  

1853-63 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button 

Color: A Coppery Gold.
Metal: Low-Convex, 2-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 25.59mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: OD 33: Unlisted Backmark
Tice: OD 233-A.3

Variation: Federal Spread Wing Eagle / Federal Type Lined Shield / E Pluribus Unum / 16 5-Point American Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: A diverse group of buttons were made for diplomats, consular personnel, officials and militia officers who wished to wear buttons with a Federal Patriotic motif to reflect their positions of Federal authority. Of all of these design patterns, this is the only one that was worn during the Civil War years! The button can have 4 different backmarks, but the E. Owen & Sons backmark is especially rare, and is the only O.D button used during the Civil War (between 1853-63). There is a cuff variant with only 6 Stars instead of a Banner Ribbon. This button can have 3 different backmarks. Schuyler being the rarest of the choices. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Spread Wing Eagle facing right with a Federal Shield on it’s chest. In the Eagle’s left talon is Three Multi-directional Arrows pointing towards the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is an Olive Branch with 5 Petals and 3 Berries. Above the eagle’s head is a stipple base Banner Ribbon with Federal government Motto, “E PLURIBUS UNUM” in all raised Roman font capital letters. Circling the legend is 16 American Five Pointed Stars. The high relief pattern is set on a plain low-convex field with a raised edge.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a two-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact.

The Robert J. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

1853-73 Official Diplomatic Service 15.18mm Gilt Brass RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1853-73 Official Diplomatic Service 15.18mm Gilt Brass RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1853-63 U.S. Official’s Diplomatic Service Button

Color: A Golden Yellow.
Metal: Low-Convex, 2-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 15.18mm. Cuff Size.
Albert’s: OD 33 Av: RV 50
Tice: OD 233-As.1
Variation: Federal Spread Wing Eagle / Federal Shield / 6 Five Pointed Stars / 16 5-Point American Stars.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the only Official Diplomat Cuff pattern manufactured prior to and during the Civil War years. There appears to be 3 backmarks for this cuff pattern. Two were produced by Evans & Co., and 1 was by Schulyer H & G. All the cuff variants depict Six 5 Pointed Stars instead of a Banner Ribbon which is depicted on the larger coat button. The button’s pattern depicts a Federal Spread Wing Eagle facing right with a Federal Type Shield on it’s chest. In the Eagle’s left talon is Three Multi-directional Arrows pointing towards the left. In the Eagle’s right talon is an Olive Branch with 5 Petals. Above the eagle’s head is Six 5-Pointed Stars in an arc. Circling the legend is 16 American Five Pointed Stars. The high relief pattern is set on a plain low-convex field with a raised edge.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a two-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight and intact. D. EVANS & CO.*/EXTRA inner stipple ring.

The Robert J. Silverstein Collection.

 

EARLY AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC SERVICE BUTTONS

 

OFFICIAL DIPLOMAT BUTTON CARD RJ SILVERSTEIN'S GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM O

 

 

UNITED STATES AMBASSADOR BUTTONS

AMBASSADOR BUTTONS RJ SILVERSTEINS GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM O