1775 – 1783
The American
Continental Army

Officer’s U.S.A Pattern

Silver or Tinned Pewter Repousse

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       I would like to welcome Metal Detector enthusiast Rick Lissy of New Jersey for being able to provide our Revolutionary War section a strong starting point. Hopefully, he will be joining our library’s team, and offering us his valuable time into some of the history behind Revolutionary War buttons. Maybe in his free time he will be able to champion this section and provide the revolutionary war button community a historic perspective with adding information relevant to the buttons we post.

With the RRN Molds he was able to dig, we are able to have a real starting point into the American theatre. Meaning, even though French & British Army Regt. buttons existed years before and after the Revolution,  we can finally find an entrance Naval buttons. There will be times when Rick or I will add small sections of context information in-between. this new dynamic should make collecting Revolutionary War buttons more fun.

To begin this section properly, we are going to start with the King George III knowledge and the steps he took in preparation to the colonists revolts. So, opening Forward will be in chronological order of Mr. Rick Lissy’s British RRN Mold, followed by the Continental Congress official Masonic “Don’t Tread on Me” (Which none exist). then the introduction of Mr. Dale Hawley’s Pewter Navy Anchor Button making the Navy’s 1st appearance of a Barbed Barbed Crown. this will be followed by Mr. Robert J. Silverstein’s Continental French Yellow Metal Continental Navy button.

Rhode Island Royal Navy: I did a quick look on line there was a Pawtucket Rangers out of Rhode Island = RIR for Rhode Island Rangers this militia was made of many towns not just Pawtucket and there was a 1st Rhode Island Regiment = RIR consisting of Negro’s and American Indians Rev War but the waves under those initials indicate Navy or it was a symbol for Rhode Island three waves. The RNN I can’t make work with written records trying  Rhode Island Newport Navy at the start of the Rev War 1774 to 1775 I find it interesting the first Commander of the Continental Navy was out of Rhode Island Marines again I thought 1775 to 1776 have to double check the dates. If you look beyond the obvious and this is where Don T missed the mark (Which I am not surprised since he could not just google his answer) I believe the mold was made around 1774 to 1775. Rhode Island started a Navy and being British subjects still, they most likely had buttons made RRN = RhodeIsland Royal Navy then 1775 to 1776 we are at war with the mother country Britain so these men as Marines are at West point off the Hudson and other places during the Rev War period . The problem is sea fairing men never wore pewter buttons always brass the pewter was to soft a metal to hold up to the rigors or hardship  labor of the sailors life while at sea. Although a lead mold made from a brass original would produce a replica of these first Royal RhodeIsland Navy buttons while they are on land and that is exactly where 99% of all Americans fought the British.  I’m not mis-spelling Rhode Island you need to think outside the box.            

 

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There was a series of prior events that were being played out in the Colonies which led up to the heightened breaking point of the Patriots suffrage which lead up to Skirmishes on the Greens of Lexington and Concord. Rebellious acts taking place in all the colonies by Patriots fueled the fires of discontent months prior to the Second Continental Congress actions to authorize a standing army under George Washington.  these actions along Dr. Benjamin Franklins use of the era’s media to call for unification through propaganda rally-cry. Ancient history symbols were being used such as, The Liberty Cap & Pole, and other religious based symbols reflected freedom for the oppressed. Unfortunately, the colonial status of 2nd class Citizenry in major cities and uneducated farmers wasn’t enough to stand in the face of the overwhelming British Military, or network of influence of the British citizens in the social and political environment in the colonies. The British Empire’s advanced position on the World’s Stage was a reflection of insurmountable strength.

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1775 to 1783

America’s Continental Army & State Militia

       General George Washington was elected by unanimous vote by the Second Continental Congress as, the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, and he retained this position throughout the war with the British Empire. There were also eight Brigadier Generals appointed simultaneously, Seth Pomeroy, Richard Montgomery, David Wooster, William Heath, Joseph Spencer, John Thomas, John Sullivan, and Nathanael Greene (After Pomeroy did not accept, John Thomas was appointed in his place). Also, four Major-Generals were commissioned: Artemas Ward, Charles Lee, Philip Schuyler, and Israel Putnam.  

     When the American Revolutionary War reached a feverish breaking point with the skirmish on the Greens of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775, the patriots did not have a formal organized supplied army.  Militia volunteers with their revolutionary hearts filed-out the ranks of Washington’s Continental army.  These were common citizens with little or no military experience in military protocols.

       As early as 1774, colonists began to form militias in their own colonies for preparation of the inevitable conflict with the British. The informal training of militia men in secret increased after the passage of the Intolerable Acts in 1774. Outspoken colonists such as Richard Henry Lee proposed forming a national militia force, but the First Continental Congress rejected the idea because of hopes that the British would compromise with their economic constraints they placed upon the colonies. This was an error on the 1st Continental Congress part. For they would still have to dress the 2nd class status of citizenship.

 

1775 Thomas 2nd Regiment of Massachusetts Grand Army

       On April 23, 1775, shortly after the skirmish one the Greens of Lexington and Concord, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress authorized the raising of a colonial army consisting of 26 company regiments. Commonly known as the Massachusetts Grand Army of 1775. New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut soon raised similar, but smaller forces. By June 14, 1775, the Second Continental Congress decided to proceed with the establishment of a Continental Army for purposes of common defense, and adopting the forces already in place outside Boston (22,000 troops) and New York (5,000). The first ten companies of Continental Army was given a one-year enlistment. In January of 1776, Washington and his Generals set up the 1st Continental Regiments: 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 17th, 18th, 20th,21st, 22nd, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, Hartley’s & Lee’s Additional Regt., and Congress’s own Regt. from Canadian forces. These newly forming Continental Regiments were reorganized from a mix of established state militia and new volunteers. The 1st Continental Army had riflemen from Pennsylvania, and Light Infantry from Maryland, Delaware and Virginia. 

 

1777-82 Continental Army Enlisted Man’s Pattern
Coat Size 19.28mm Cast Pewter, 1-Piece

       Soldiers in the Continental Army were citizens who had volunteered to serve in the Continental Army but were paid enlistments. The standard enlistment periods ranged from one to three years. In the beginning of the war the enlistment periods were short, as the Continental Congress feared the possibility of the Continental Army evolving into a permanent army. A little known fact is that the army never numbered more than 17,000 men. Turnover proved to be a constant problem for General George Washington, especially in the winter of 1776–77. This high attrition rate was the cause for the Second Continental Congress Board of War to approve longer enlistments. Realistically thinking, General George Washington’s Continental Army consisted of several successive armies. By 1783, most of the Continental Army was disbanded in hopes for a Paris Peace Treaty. General Washington and his remaining Generals encamped the Continental Army’s last 7,200 troops in New Windsor’s Cantonment, West Point, and around the shores of Newburgh. The 1st and 2nd Regiments went on to form the nucleus of Waynes Legion 8 years later in 1792 under General Anthony Wayne. This became the foundation of the United States Army in 1796. George Washington had to fight for this because he did not want our country to be at the mercy of hired European mercenaries. 

 

6th Massachusetts Regiment of 1781
Coat Size 00.00 Cast Pewter, 1-Piece

This unit was part of the Continental Army’s reorganization of 1781. There service was primarily garrison duty in the Hudson Valley and around West Point. This is the enlisted man’s 2nd pattern, small size. The button’s pattern depicts the abbreviation for Massachusetts, “MASS” in an arc above the Roman numeral “VI.” Below is a set of Crossed Sabers.

 

 

 

 

The Continental Army U.S.A Pattern Buttons

     The “USA” pattern button was the most commonly used button by the Continental Army. All military branches of the service used this pattern. The button’s first appearance is unknown, but Don T. mentioned they first were issued in the late spring or early summer of 1777.  Troops either used them solely, or in conjunction with civilian, or their own state regt. buttons. There are several known variations and sizes to the USA intertwined pattern. Most sizes range from 15mm to 22mm, but there have been some larger 25-27mm. buttons found. Most issued USA patterns are known to be one-piece pewter buttons with a loop shank. There are some 2-piece officer buttons that were made from Silvered or Tinned Repousse which were wrapped over Florida boxwood.  Variations of patterns and sizes has been found on every Revolutionary War battle site and encampment. A large quantity of these buttons were made by professional button makers, or made at established government workshops. They were either given to directly to clothiers for uniforms, issued out loosely to troops as replacements, or issued to the various military departments. Also, there are French white-metal-pewter mixes that were given out in a limited quantity at the later half of the war. 

 

 

tinental Army USA officers Pattern 25mm pewter wood back cat gut cordRJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O tinental Army USA officers Pattern 25mm pewter wood back cat gut cordRJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1780-84 Continental Army Officer’s Pattern (French Import)

Color: A Silvery Gray.
Metal: Silvered or Tinned Repousse.
Size: 26.5mm.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Repousse Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This button is the large size officers pattern. The button’s pattern depicts a french style overlaid U.S.A. pattern that is within a double concentric ring border. The serifs of the letter “A” just fall short of touching the border. This unique pattern mirrored Lafayette’s French made belt plates, and infantry hangers. This is a wonderful example, that has been well kept through the ages.
Reverse Button Analysis: This button has a wood back, and uses a cat gut cord for the attachment.

The William Leigh Collection.

 

 

 

1776-83 Continental Army 34.05mm 9.68 Grams Sept 18,14 ebay $678 1776-83 Continental Army 34.05mm 9.68 Grams Sept 18,14 ebay $678 r

1780-84 Continental Army Satchel Button (American Lathe Turned – French Design)

Color: A Dull Gray.
Metal: White Metal.
Size: 34.05mm.   9.68 Grns.   Satchel or Cape Size
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This USA button is an unusually large size. The maker most likely designed it for a top cape button or possibly a satchel. The button was most likely made by a Patriot instead of a skilled engraver. The button appears to lathe turned with hand carved lettering. The letters lines in this specimen just lack the straight lines that a guild’s craftsman would make for a special order. The pattern depicts the french style overlaid U.S.A. pattern. The pattern is in high relief on a plain flat field without any raised edge border. This unique pattern mirrored Lafayette’s French made belt plates, and infantry hangers. This is a dug representation and I would like to know where it was dug to try to get some provenance to a geographical area. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This button is a one-piece button with a loop shank set in a boss. (Tombac Style).

 

 

 

Enlisted Man's Pattern USA (French Import) Button 18mm Virginia Dug RJ SILVERSTEIN'S GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM O 1777 Enlisted Man's Pattern U.S.A Pewter dug around fredricksburg, VA R

1777-82 Continental Army Enlisted Man’s Pattern.

Color: A Silvery Grey.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 19.21mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: After 1779, this coat button became the most common pattern used by enlisted men in the Continental Army. This pattern has been found in almost all campsites and battlefields from the beginning to the end of the war. This USA button is the small size enlisted man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts a “USA” in intertwined high relief letters. There is a raised pie-crust border
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

Excavated near Fredericksburg, Virginia.
The RJ Silverstein Collection.~ 

 

 

 

listed Man's Pattern U.S.A. (French Import) Button 18mm Virginia Dug RJ SILVERSTEIN'S GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM REnlisted Man's Pattern USA (French Import) Button 18mm Virginia Dug RJ SILVERSTEIN'S GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM O

 

1781-82 Continental Army Enlisted Man’s Pattern (French Design & Import)

Color: A Silvery Charcoal Brown.
Metal: White Metal.
Size: 18.77mm. Coat Size. 
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains. 
Robert’s Notes: This French made button could have originated from an earlier requisition in 1779, and then stock piled in France. We know the original order was bound for America upon the ship, “Marquis de Lafayette” but it was captured at sea by the British and it’s cargo auctioned off in London. The French order that was finally delivered in 1781 was arranged by Colonel John Laurens in France. This issue was a small quantity which makes this button a little more scarce then the common USA patterns. This French import style that was issued to the enlisted men still in the Continental Army toward the end of the war. This is the small size enlisted man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts an intertwined “USA” in high relief, with a plain border
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original and intact, but slightly bent to the right.

Excavated in Virginia.
The RJ Silverstein Collection.~

 

 

 

1780's French USA button 27mm tinned Orig Shank georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1780's French USA button 27mm Tinned Orig Shank georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1780’s Continental Army Enlisted Man’s Pattern (French Design & Import)

Color: A Silvery Rose.
Metal: Tinned.
Size: 27.mm. Coat size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This is a French style pattern that was issued to the Continental Army soldiers toward the end of the war. This is a large coat size enlisted man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts a high relief intertwined “USA” pattern. There appears to be a small insiced edge trim. A letter variation can be found in this pattern.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

The W.L. Collection.~

 

 

1776 North Carolina alan Gaskin Dug georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O

North Carolina Intertwined USA Pattern

Color: A Dusty Brown.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Rarity: R-5
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is an exceptionally rare N C USA coat pattern that was known to be used by North Carolina volunteers. There is no data to when this pattern was first issued, but we do know the pattern was used during the Revolutionary War time frame. The current theory is that these were used by troops mostly stationed within North Carolina. There have been a few examples found with other regiment numbers, and also a few in South Carolina, and one in Maryland. The button’s pattern depicts “USA” in high relief intertwined letters. Above is the Letter, “N” for North, and below is the letter, “C” for Carolina.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

Found along the banks of the town Creek in Bruinswick County, N.C. March 2011.~
There was a skirmish there when Cornwall came up from S.C and took Wilmington, N.C.

Originally Dug & Owned by Allen Gaskins

 

 

 

North Carolina Intertwined USA Pattern

Color: A Clay Ochre of Browns & Reds.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 16mm. Cuff Size.
Rarity: R-6 
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is an exceptionally rare NC Cuff USA pattern that was known to be used by North Carolina volunteers. There is no data to when this pattern was first issued, but we do know the pattern was used during the Revolutionary War time frame. The current theory is that these were used by troops mostly stationed within North Carolina. There have been a few examples found with other regiment numbers, and also a few in South Carolina, and one in Maryland. The button’s pattern depicts “USA” in high relief intertwined letters. Above is the Letter, “N” for North, and below is the letter, “C” for Carolina.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

Dug by Keith Nixon in a Sandy knoll in Brunswick County, N.C. 2017.

 

1777 USA Continental Army Enlisted Mans dug on a farm in CT 2007 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O 1777 USA Continental Army Enlisted Mans dug on a farm in CT 2007 georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

 

1777 Continental Army Enlisted Man’s Pattern (Crude Field Mold)

Color: A Silvery Grey.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 20mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: A Excavated Example, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button is another variation of the U.S.A. pattern that was used by the enlisted men. Found at Valley Forge where the Continental Army was known to have a winter encampment. The button’s pattern depicts an intertwined and overlaid “USA” pattern in high relief. Below is the number date, “1777” in high relief. In this pattern there is raised cable or link border around the periphery. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse rhank. The shank is reportedly broken off.

Excavated on a farm in Connecticut, 2007.

 

 

The Continental Regiments of 1776 

General George Washington’s General orders of November 13th 1775:

     The Colonels upon the new establishment to settle as soon as possible with the Quartermaster General the uniforms of their Respective regiments that the buttons may be properly numbered and the work finished without delay.

 

William Leigh Collection

1776-1777 5th Continental Regiment

Color: A Silvery-Gray Mix.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 17.06mm. Cuff Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The 5th Continental Regiment was organized from the 1st New Hampshire Regt on January 1, 1776. Served during the Siege of Boston. Had operations at Lake Champlain, Canada, Princeton and Trenton, NJ. This button’s pattern depicts a large Arabic number “5” in the center. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is reportedly original, straight, and intact.

The William Leigh Collection.~

 

 

1776-1777 Continental Regiment 22.76mm Pewter AC 13.a No Shank PD $812 03-13-16 O11776-1777 Continental Regiment 22.76mm Pewter AC 13.a No Shank PD $812 03-13-16 R1

1776-1777 13th Continental Regiment

Color: A Two-Tone Gray W/ Brown Undertones.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 22.76 mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The 13th Continental Regiment was formed in January of 1776. The regt. was formed from elements from Reads, Walkers, and Brewers Massachusetts’s State Troops (AKA The Grand Army). The 13th Regt. served in the City of New York, and in Trenton and Princeton New Jersey. The regiment was disbanded a year later in January 1777, in Morristown, New Jersey. Specimens have been found in Saratoga, Hudson Highlands, Redoubt # 4, Kingsbridge, N.Y.C. The button’s pattern depicts a large Arabic number “13” in the center. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse rhank. The shank is unfortunately missing.

Dug at Saratoga, New York.
The RJ. Silverstein Collection.~

 

 

Continental Army 14th Regiment Cast Pewter 23mm don T riaoni RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com

1776 14th Continental Regiment

Color: A Charcoal Gray Mix.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 22.02mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The 14th Continental Regiment was organized from Glover’s Massachusetts regiment on January 1, 1776. During the year, they engaged in the siege of Boston, participated in both the Long Island and New York campaigns, along with the battle at Trenton-Princeton. The regiment officially disbanded December 31,1776 in Pennsylvania. This button’s pattern depicts a large Arabic number “14” in the center. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse rhank. The Shank is reportedly original, straight, and intact.

The Don Troiani Collection.~

 

 

CONTINENTAL ARMY 25TH REGIMENT 22MM PEWTER DON T. RJ SILVERSTEIN'S GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS

1776-1777 25th CONTINENTAL REGIMENT

Color: A Pewter Gray.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 22.00 mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief PAttern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The 25th Continental Regiment was organized from Gardner’s Massachusetts Regiment, with additional companies from Cotton’s and Danielson’s Regiments in January 1776. This regiment served at the siege of Boston, and helped with the defense of Canada, had actions in Lake Champlain, and in New Jersey in 1776. they consolidated with the 24th regiment in January of 1777, and were re-designated as Greaton’s Regiment. This button’s pattern depicts a large Arabic number “25” in the center. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field with a faint raised lip rim.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

The Don Troiani Collection.~

 

The Connecticut Regiments 

 

 

1st Connecticut Regiment of 1781

 

 

1781 1st Conn. Reg. enlist. mas pewter 25mm excav. hudon highlands georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O

1st Connecticut Regiment of 1781

Color: Pewter Gray with Orange Speckles.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 25mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Example, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the large size enlisted man’s pattern.  The button’s pattern depicts raised Arabic number “1” with a slight “J” foot over the block letters “CR.” Unlike most uniform buttons during this period, this button is slight domed. Don states in his book that 1st Regiment is the most common of all “CR” buttons, and this first regiment was most likely best outfitted with these buttons. There appears to have been two styles of “CR” buttons that have been excavated. The first pattern has raised numbers and block letters. The second has an impressed foliated pattern letter and number. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a cast loop for the reverse shank. The shank condition is unknown.

Excavated in the Hudson Highlands.
The Don Troiani Collection.~

 

2nd Connecticut Regiment of 1781 

 

 

1781 2nd Conn Regt. 26mm Silvered Repousse Sheet Pewter Dolphin Motif georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O 1781 2nd Conn Regt. 26mm Silvered Repousse Sheet Pewter Dolphin Motif georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

2nd Connecticut Regiment of 1781

Color: Silvered Gray.
Metal: Silvered Repouse Sheet Pewter.
Size: 26mm. Coat size.
Albert’s: CT 2-A

Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Repousse Condition, Strong A High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the large size Officer’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts a raised Dolphins with a Dot surrounding an Arabic “2” depicted. Two Concentric Rings around the edge border. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a Wood back button, possibly Florida Boxwood. Cut Gut Cord for attachment. 

Collector’s notes: David Gates of Vermont obtained all of the known specimens from an auction in England. He told me there was no known specimens of this type in America previously. He actually obtained these buttons as extra items, and then sold them off at a show he did years back. Price Ranges in 2015-2016 were around $1500-$2200. in the last two noted sales. Since none had ever been dug or found as heirlooms in America, button collector’s should determine it’s actual historical relevancy and usage aside from publications. 

 

connecticut8014

2nd Connecticut Regiment of 1781

Color: Reddish Brown.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: CT 2-B

Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the large Enlisted Man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts an Arabic “2” is depicted over “C.R”. The high relief pattern is set on a plain field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece cast button with loop shank.

 

4th Connecticut Regiment of 1781 

 

 

William Leigh Collection o

4th Connecticut Regiment of 1781

Color: Two-Tone Golden Brown.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Albert’s: CT 4-B
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the large Enlisted Man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts an Arabic “4” is depicted over “C.R“for Conn. Regt. The high relief pattern is set on a plain field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece cast button with loop shank.

The William Leigh Collection.

 

The Georgia Colony

 

The 4th Georgia Regiment

 

1777-1781 Georgia 4th Regt. 24mm Pewter RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1777-1781 Georgia 4th Regt. 24mm Pewter RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1777-1781 4th Georgia Regiment 

Color: Pewter Silver.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 24mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts an Arabic number “4” to identify the regt. designation. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Buttons Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

 

The Colony of Massachusetts

 

Inimica Tyrannis Buttons

 

 

Inimica Tyrannis 23mm Pewter 1776 Henry Jackson's Boston Mass Malitia george washingtoninauguralbuttons.com 0Inimica Tyrannis 23mm Pewter 1776 Henry Jackson's Boston Mass Malitia george washingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1776 Inimica Tyrannis Boston’s Independent Militia

Color: An Olive Brown Orange Mixture.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 21.01mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Poor Planchet condition, Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: Originally this button was suppose to say “Hec Manus Inimica Tyrannis” on a plain field, but the design of a hand holding a drawn sword was thought to be more expressive then a motto, and also thought to be more representative of a fighting company. The original pattern idea also included a broken scabbard, but the design was never used for unknown reasons. The company’s original Commander Henry Jackson was given an additional regiment in 1777, who were also issued this pattern. The button was used until 1781, and then they were consolidated with the 9th Massachusetts regiment. This button has been found in the Hudson Highlands, and also the New Boston Cantonment along with Massachusetts 9th Regiment buttons. Some additional research theorizes this button may have been pre-cast as early as July or August of 1776, which was before the General Court of Massachusetts received a petition for the uniform code which was in December 1776.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is unfortunately missing.

The RJ Silverstein Collection.

 

 

The Massachusetts Grand Army Buttons

     In April of 1775, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress created by act the “Massachusetts Grand Army” which consisted of 13,600 troops. On June 29 1775, 13,000 uniform coats were ordered and were to be trimmed with pewter buttons with their respective regiment number. The first shipment was provided by Joseph Jones, Jr. of Mendon, Massachusetts. This order consisted of 5,797 dozen pewter buttons. Unfortunately, the button supplier could not keep up with the original order to have the troops supplied with their coats before the winter season. Therefore, the clothing committee ordered the coats to be delivered to the troops with or without the buttons. 

     In 1775, John Clarke also became a military button contractor for Massachusetts. In a letter to the clothing committee he reiterates the request that the coats should be distributed to the troops with or without the regiment’s number button. The letter helps us establishes that these coats and buttons were being issued to troops regardless of the proper regiment number. These numbered buttons should be considered stock buttons, and distributed without discretion to all soldiers in the Massachusetts Grand Army. By the end of 1775, the regiments of the Massachusetts Grand Army were integrated into the 27 new Continental Regiments that were newly forming. When they were reorganized, the uniforms and buttons were still used by the troops in their new Continental regiments. This is most likely the reason why they are found intermixed with the borderless variety known to be used by the Continental regiments. 

 

 

 

 

Grand Army Thomas 2nd Reg. Pewter 22mm. Dale H excav. gen. knox trail rj silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com 0Grand Army Thomas 2nd Reg. Pewter 22mm. Dale H excav. gen. knox trail rj silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1775 Thomas 2nd Regiment of Massachusetts Grand Army 

Color: A Silvery Ocher.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Rarity: R-7 (Only 2 known to exist)
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet condition, Strong high Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This unique button pattern is the same style used by The Massachusetts Grand Army of 1775. Thomas commanded the 2nd regiment, and it is thought that this button would be attributed to him. The button uses his initial, “T” instead of “2” for the regiment he commanded. This unit later consolidated with Cotton’s 4th Regiment to form Washington’s 23rd Continental Army Regiment. The button’s pattern depicts the initial “T” in high relief. This is encompassed by a channeled double ring concentric border. Inside the channel is a series of 21 raised stipples. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

A second button with this pattern was found around Mount Independence.

This button was excavated on the New York-Massachusetts Border, of what is known as the General Knox’s trail. This path was used by Knox to bring the Cannons over to George Washington when he was in Dorchester Heights Boston, from Fort Ticonderoga.
The Dale Collection.  

 

 

1775 Massachusetts Grand Army 2nd Regt 22mm Pewter RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com )1775 Massachusetts Grand Army 2nd Regt 22mm Pewter RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1775 Massachusetts Grand Army # 2 Button

Color: A Pewter Gray.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 23mm. Coat Size.
Rarity: R-5
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet condition, A Strong high Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The Massachusetts Grand Army of 1775. These Grand Army buttons should be considered stock buttons and not relating to any specific unit. Don T. believes that there should not be an assignment number to a specific regt. At the end of 1775, the regiments of the Grand Army were absorbed into the newly forming 27 Continental regiments. Most likely the uniforms and the buttons went with these troops into the new continental regt. The button’s pattern depicts the Arabic number “2” in the center. This is followed by an outer raised Concentric Ring. There is a roughly 21 raised stipples in the legend. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat filed with a thin raised edge.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

The William Leigh Collection.

 

1775 Massachusetts Grand Army 23mm Pewter georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O

1775 Massachusetts Grand Army # 6 Button

Color: A Pewter Gray.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 23mm. Coat Size.
Rarity: R-5
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet condition, A Strong high Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The Massachusetts Grand Army of 1775. These Grand Army buttons should be considered stock buttons and not relating to any specific unit. Don T. believes that there should not be an assignment number to a specific regt. At the end of 1775, the regiments of the Grand Army were absorbed into the newly forming 27 Continental regiments. Most likely the uniforms and the buttons went with these troops into the new continental regt. The button’s pattern depicts the Arabic number “5” in the center. This is followed by an outer raised Concentric Ring. There is a roughly 20 raised stipples in the legend. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat filed with a thin raised edge.  
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

 

1775 Massachusetts Grand Army 8th Regt 22mm Pewter RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1775 Massachusetts Grand Army 8th Regt 22mm Pewter RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1775 Massachusetts Grand Army # 8 Button

Color: A Pewter Gray.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 23mm. Coat Size.
Rarity: R-5
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet condition, A Strong high Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The Massachusetts Grand Army of 1775. These Grand Army buttons should be considered stock buttons and not relating to any specific unit. Don T. believes that there should not be an assignment number to a specific regt. At the end of 1775, the regiments of the Grand Army were absorbed into the newly forming 27 Continental regiments. Most likely the uniforms and the buttons went with these troops into the new continental regt. The button’s pattern depicts the Arabic number “8” in the center. This is followed by an outer raised Concentric Ring. There is a roughly 25 raised stipples in the legend. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat filed with a thin raised edge.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

 

 

1st Massachusetts Regt. of 1781

 

 

1775 MS 1.A 22MM SILVER :BONE BACK RJ SILVERSTEINS GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM O1775 MS 1.A 22MM SILVER :BONE BACK RJ SILVERSTEINS GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM R

1st Massachusetts 1st Regiment of 1781

Color: A Silvery Gray.
Metal: Silvered Sheet Brass Front
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Rarity: R-6
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, An Exceptional High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is an officer’s large size coat button. The button’s pattern depicts a large Roman numeral “I” in the center. Above is a crude banner ribbon with the abbreviation for Massachusetts, “MASS.” in Roman font capital letters. Below is a decorative Floral Half Wreath. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a Bone Back button with 4 sew holes. The attachment is cat gut cord.

The W. L. Collection.

 

 

3rd Massachusetts Regt. of 1781

 

 

1781 MASS 3RD REG.23.6 PEWTER DUG GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM O

1781 MASS 3RD REG.23.6 PEWTER DUG GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM R

 

3rd Massachusetts Regiment of 1781

Color: A Clear Polish Golden Brown
Metal: Cast Pewter. 
Size: 23.5mm.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts the abbreviation for Massachusetts, “MAS,” over the Roman numeral “III” with the abbreviation for regiment, “REG” below. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a Loop Shank. The Shank is original, straight, and intact.

Excavated on Knox’s Trail Massachusetts/Connecticut Border.
The Dale Collection ~ Wife’s Button Find.~

 

5th Massachusetts Regt. of 1781

 

1781 5TH MASS. 19MM. BLOCK TIN RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O

5th Massachusetts Regiment of 1781

Color: A Clear Polish Golden Brown.
Metal: Cast Pewter
Size: 19mm. Vest or Cuff Size
Present Condition: An Excavated Example, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the small enlisted man’s 1st pattern. The button’s pattern depicts the abbreviation for Massachusetts, “MAS” over a Roman numeral “V.” Below is the abbreviation for Regiment, “REG.” The button has a thin raised cable edge trim. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a loop shank. Unknown information.

6th Massachusetts Regt. of 1781

 

1781 6th Massachusetts Regiment Pewter 17mm Orig Shank enlist mans AM6.f Paid $185 3-9-12 1781 6th Massachusetts Regiment Pewter 17mm Orig Shank enlist mans AM6.f Paid $185. 3-9-12 R

6th Massachusetts Regiment of 1781

Color: A Pewter Gray with Golden Orange Spots.
Metal: Cast Pewter
Size: 17mm.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Fair Planchet Condition, A Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This unit was part of the Continental Army’s reorganization of 1781. There service was primarily garrison duty in the Hudson Valley and around West Point. This is the enlisted man’s 2nd pattern, small size. The button’s pattern depicts the abbreviation for Massachusetts, “MASS” in an arc above the Roman numeral “VI.” Below is a set of Crossed Sabers. The high relief pattern is set on a flat plain field. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one pice button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

Excavated in the Hudson Valley, New York.
The RJ Silverstein Collection.

 

 

7th Massachusetts Regt. of 1781

 

 

MASSACHUSETTS 7TH REG. NO SHANK PICKET POST rj georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com o 7th Mass Back

7th Massachusetts Regiment of 1781

Color: A Pewter Gray with A Glossy Finish .
Metal: Pewter
Size: 17mm. Cuff Size
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This unit was part of the Continental Army’s reorganization of 1781. The button’s pattern depicts the abbreviation for Massachusetts, “MASS” in an arc above the Roman numeral “VII.” Below is a Half Wreath. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

The B. Henderson Collection.~

 

The Massachusetts Ordnance Buttons of 1778

     In May of 1778, two sailing ships, arrived with war supplies that were purchased by the Commonwealth of Massaachusetts for the troops who were serving on the New England line. These were considered high quality French white metal Army buttons. They are believed to be made by Tallene, who was a pewter manufacturer for the French until 1783. The ship’s manifest indicates the Commonwealth of Massachussetts recieved over 2600 gross of what was termed, “Ordnance Buttons.” They gross included two evenly supplied size amounts, and numbers ranged from 1 through 10. This Massachussett’s order is presumed to be the French style buttons that are commonly found on 1779-1783 campsites of New England Troops. These buttons are believed to be handed out loosley, and not given out to coincide with any specific regiment number. Eventhough the manifest indicates there was even numbers in numbers and sizes, there appears to be a disportionate number of sizes and numerals found at campsites. As of date, the only large size numerals found are 1, 2, and 9. These large coat size buttons are more scarce. The smaller more commonly found cuff size is numbers 1, 2, 5, 7, and 9. These are a little more obtainable on the market, but still limited. It is unknown what happened to the other numbers in the shipment. This is open to speculation. 

 

 

 

1778 Mass. Ordnance 2nd Regiment 17mm Turret BackRJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com 11778 Mass. Ordnance 2nd Regiment 17mm Turret RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1778 Massachusetts Ordnance Button #2

Color: An Ocher Pigment of Brownish-Red.
Metal: White Metal.
Size: 17mm.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts the regiment number, “2” in the center of a Concentric Rings and an Open Circle with almost touching Iris ends. There is a small raised Stipple above the center of the iris ends in the legend. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field.This button was originally purchased by the state of Massachusetts, but it’s use was widespread by the troops throughout all of the New England Lines. This button was extremely common to campsites that were occupied by troops between the years of 1779-83. Records indicate that in 1778, the State of Massachusetts received over 2600 gross of what was termed Ordnance Buttons in both large 24mm., and small 17mm. sizes. They numbered one through ten. The small sizes 1, 2, 5, 7, & 9 appear to have been found in some quantities, while the larger pattern are more scarce. Only the larger 1, 2, and 9 in the 24mm. have been found to date. Most likely these were not attached to uniforms given or issued. Most likely these were issued loose, and they were given with no regard as to if the numbering coincided with the units that received them. Since supplies were scarce, they were probably given out, and you got what you got kind of thing is the most probable scenario.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a Turret Style shank. The turret is straight, upright and intact.

The RJ Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

1778 Mass. Ordnance 5th Regiment 17mm RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com o ance 5th Regiment 17mm Turret 1778 Mass. Ordnance 5th Regiment 17mm RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1778 Massachusetts Ordnance Button #5

Color: An Earthy Grayish-Brown.
Metal: White Metal.
Size: 17mm.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts the regiment number, “5” in the center of a Concentric Rings and an Open Circle with almost touching Iris ends. There is a small raised Stipple above the center of the iris ends in the legend.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a Turret style shank. The turret is straight, upright and intact.

The RJ Silverstein Collection.

 

 

RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com o 1778 Mass. Ordnance 7th Regiment 17mm TurretRJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1778 Massachusetts Ordnance Button #7

Color: An Olive Gray.
Metal: White Metal.
Size: 17mm.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts the regiment number, “7” in the center of a Concentric Rings and an Open Circle with almost touching Iris ends. There is a small raised Stipple above the center of the iris ends in the legend.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a Turret style shank. The Turret is straight, upright and intact.

The RJ Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

1778 Mass. Ordnance 7th Regiment 17mm Turret RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com o1778 Mass. Ordnance 7th Regiment 17mm Turret RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1778 Massachusetts Ordnance Button #9

Color: An Ocher Pigment of Brownish-Yellow.
Metal:  White Metal.
Size: 17mm.
Rarity: R-1
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: The button’s pattern depicts the regiment number, “9” in the center of a Concentric Rings and an Open Circle with almost touching Iris ends.There is a small raised Stipple above the center of the iris ends in the legend.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a Turret style shank. The turret is straight, upright and intact.

The RJ Silverstein Collection.

 

The Colony of New York

 

 

New York’s “NY” Buttons 

 

 

New York Regimental RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com

1776-1778 New York “NY” Button

Color: A Dull Pewter Gray
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 17mm.
Present Condition: An Excavated Example, Good Planchet, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This pattern was one of the earliest known used buttons used by the New York Continental Regiments, but it wasn’t the first. The Colony of New York pattern (A British Royal Crown above two dots and the letters “CN” in the center with raised dot border) was in use before the declaration of independence. The joined NY buttons were used for only about two years by the New York Continental Regiments; and then it vanished after the French Lottery coats were distributed for use. The pattern has been found in the Hudson Valley by West Point, Fishkill Barracks, Fort Clinton & Montgomery, and also around Fort Stanwix.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one piece casting for the reverse shank. Unknown information.

Excavated in the Hudson Valley, New York.

 

North Carolina 

 

 

 

North Carolina USA Button 

     There are no records to when this pattern was first made or issued, but it is believed this pattern was used towards the end of the war. Since most specimens have been dug in North Carolina, it is believed to be issued for troops who were stationed within the state. There were a few specimens that have been in South Carolina, and one in Maryland. This could be from a small detachment or troops joining other Continental regiments. These NC USA buttons also have been dug with other regiment numbers which gives credence to dating to Revolutionary War years. 

 

 

1776 North Carolina alan Gaskin Dug georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O

North Carolina Intertwined USA Pattern

Color: A Dusty Brown.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This is an exceptionally rare USA pattern that was known to be used by North Carolina volunteers. The button’s pattern depicts “USA” in high relief intertwined letters. Above is the Letter, “N” for North, and below is the letter, “C” for Carolina.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

 

3rd North Carolina Regiment

     The 3rd North Carolina Regt. was raised in January of 1776. They first served in Charleston, South Carolina, Florida, and parts of North Carolina until 1777. Afterwards they went to be reorganized under the main Continental Army.  Their record of duty included Monmouth, Philadelphia, and service Hudson Highlands until December of 1778. In 1779, they were at Halifax, North Carolina and in May of 1780 they took part in the siege of Charleston South Carolina.In January of 1783, they officially disbanded. 

image3

 

North Carolina 3rd 25mm Pewter Dug on a colonial site in south carolina georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O North Carolina 3rd 25mm Pewter Dug on a colonial site in south carolina georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

3rd NORTH CAROLINA REGIMENT of 1776

Color: Pewter Gray.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 25mm.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Fair High Relief Pattern remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the large size enlisted man’s coat button. It is the unlisted Dome version with Serifs. The button’s pattern depicts the initials for North Carolina, “NC” over the Arabic number “3” in the center. This is encompassed by a raised triple ring edge border. This regiment was raised in January of 1776, and served in Charleston, Florida, and North Carolina until February of 1777. Then it was sent to re-enforce the Maine Army. Served in the Philadelphia Campaign, and was present at Monmouth Courthouse. After the Hudson Highlands in 1778, they went to Halifax North Carolina in 1779, and then was captured at the siege of Charleston, S.C. in May of 1780. Officially disbanded in Spring of 1783.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, but bent over.

Excavated in Camp Ponpon, east of the Edisto River in 2012.
The Chris Caroll Collection. 

 

New Hampshire 

 

 

 

 

3rd New Hampshire Regiment 

     There are only small size pewter buttons found for each of the three New Hampshire regiments. All three regiments are scarce and come from the Hudson highlands around New Windsor and West Point area. This is the only distinctive pattern that is directly associated directly with New Hampshire’s 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Regiments. These buttons along with USA intertwined Coat and Massachusetts Ordnance buttons were found at “Hampshire Huts” from their 1781 winter encampment.  The 3rd New Hampshire Regiment along with the 1st & 2nd New Hampshire, and the 10th Massachusetts, comprised all of the defenses around West Point. This was most likely a deterrent position from the British control of NYC and harbor. In 1782, the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment was re-stationed in Albany, New York. 

 

 

 

 

wter 17mm Ahh3.A orig shank. excav. West Point Robert Thebert Collection Now Isabelas georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O ter 17mm Ahh3.A orig shank. excav. West Point Robert Thebert Collection Now Isabela's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1781-1783 3rd New Hampshire Regiment

Color: A Dark Gray with Orange Rust Patches.
Metal: Cast Pewter.
Size: 17mm. Hat Button.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Fair Planchet Condition, A Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the small size regimental button for a hat or cuff. The button’s pattern depicts a large raised Arabic number “3” in the center. The high relief number is set on a plain flat field. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

Excavated around West Point, New York.~
The RJ Silverstein Collection. 

 

Pennsylvania 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania Recessed Center Number Buttons 

 

1777-78 Pennsylvania Line Recessed Center Button 18-24mm Pewter georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1777-78 Pennsylvania Line Recessed Center Button 18-24mm Pewter georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1777-78 Pennsylvania Recessed-Center Buttons

Color: Pewter Gray.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Impressed Center W/Raised Design, Cast Pewter.
Size: 24mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This button is attributed to the Pennsylvania Line and have been found at Valley Forge, N.J. and also Putnam’s New England Division in West Hartford, Connecticut. It is believed they were issued sometime in 1777, and then replaced with the French Lottery coat issues in 1778. This is an enlisted man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts an Arabic number “2” in a Recessed Center
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. There is some metal loss or chipping near the edge.

The William Leigh Collection.

 

 

Pennsylvania State Regiment 

 

 

Pennsylvania Pewter Reg of foot found near valley forge. aug 2011 Pennsylvania Pewter Reg of foot found near valley forge r aug 2011

PENNSYLVANIA STATE RIFLE REGIMENT

 1776

Color: Milk Chocolate Brown with Orange Undertones.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Cast Pewter.
Size: 24mm.
Troiani: APSR.a
Present Condition: An Excavated Example, Good Planchet, Good High Relief Pattern.

Isabela’s Notes: This button could possibly be a very early reproduction. There seems to be some conflict between the experts who have studied the photo’s, and the ones that studied it in hand. Since the people who studied it in hand said it was, I will graciously give it the benefit. Originally organized at Marcus Hook on March 6th, 1776 as the Pennsylvania Rifle Regiment. Consolidated later with the Pennsylvania Musketry Battalion and was re-designated as the Pennsylvania State Regiment of Foot in 1777. In 1778 it merged with the 2nd Regiment. Engaged in the New York Campaign in 1776, and in 1777 involved in the Trenton-Princeton campaign, and then the Philadelphia Campaign including Brandywine. This button is in exceptional condition for it’s age. The face shows a scalloped border that surrounds raised block letters.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. There is some metal loss or chipping near the edge.

Library Records Has Limited Information on R-24:
History:       Yes            Recorded Sales Price:    Yes

Current Button Owner and Location: ~ Pennsylvania ~



Excavated in Charlestown, Pennsylvania in August 2011.
The B. Hanisco Collection.

 

2nd Pennsylvania Battalion 

 

 

1775-76 2nd Pennsylvania Troiana A2BP. cuff orig shank 1775-76 2nd Pennsylvania Troiana A2BP. cuff orig shank r

 

2nd PENNSYLVANIA BATTALION of 1775

Color: A Rusty Orange over a Brown Undertone.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 17mm Cuff Size
Troiani: A2BP.c

Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Fair Planchet Condition, Fair Raised Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: In 1775-1776 this unit served around Canada and the Lake Champlain area. They were re-assigned to the main army in November of 1776.  Redesigned the 3rd Pennsylvania Regt. in January of 1777. This is the Enlisted man’s smaller cuff version. The button depicts the raised initials of Pennsylvania’s 2nd Battalion, “2.B” over P. The high relief pattern is set on a plain field with a raised stipple edge border.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The Shank is original and intact, but crushed inward. 

Library Records Has Limited Information on R-24:A
History:       Yes             Recorded Sales Price:      Yes

Current Button Owner and Location: ~ Virginia ~ 

 

3rd Pennsylvania Battalion

 

 

3rd PENNSYLVANIA BATTALION of 1776

Color: A Two-Tone Brown.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 18mm Believed 
Troiani: A3BP.a
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Poor Planchet Condition, Fair Raised Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: First organized in March of 1776, and then immediately served with the Main Army in the New York Campaign. Part of the regt. was captured at Fort Washington in November of 1776. By January of 1777, they were reorganized as the 4th Pennsylvania Regt. The button’s pattern depicts a raised number, “3” next to the initial for Battalion, “B”. This is over a raised “P” for Pennsylvania. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field with no edge border. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. 

Library Records Has Limited Information on R-24:B
History:    No                     Recorded Sales Price:    No
Current Button Owner and Location:            No

 

4th Pennsylvania Battalion

 

4th PENNSYLVANIA BATTALION of 1776

Color: A Grayish Blue.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Cast Pewter.
Size: 23mm Coat Size.
Present Condition: A Dug Specimen, Fair Planchet Condition, Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the large coat button for the PA 4th Battalion. The button’s pattern depicts an Arabic number “4” in-conjunction with the Battalions initial “B” above the State of Pennsylvania’s initial, “P”. The high relief pattern is set on a plain field with a thin raised edge. This unit was originally organized in January of 1776, in Chester Pennsylvania. They served in the Northern dept. from March to December of that year. there service included posts at Fort Ticonderoga, and the Lake Champlain Valley. By the following year in January 1777, they were reorganized and redesigned the 5th Pennsylvania Regiment.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. 

 

South Carolina

 

1st South Carolina Regiment 

 

 

 

South Carolina Leg Bone 1 21mm Pewter Dug Johns Island SC southcarolinaback2200

1st South CAROLINA REGIMENT of 1775

Color: Rusty Orange.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 21mm.
Troiani: A1SC.b
Present Condition:
An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern remains.

Isabela’s Notes: This is the large size enlisted man’s coat button. This is the most common button found for South Carolina. The button’s pattern depicts a Stoutly Sized raised, “Leg Bone” numeral style number one. This variant is the Thicker Style numeral one. The high relief pattern is set on a plain field with a raised rim. Unfortunately, this rim is all chipped off.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is missing.

This was Dug on John’s Island, South Carolina.
Picture Courteous of Carroll Delray. 

 

 

1775 1st South Carolina georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1775 1st South Carolina georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1st SOUTH CAROLINA REGIMENT of 1775

Color: Desert Clay.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 21mm.
Troiani: A1SC.a
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is the large size enlisted man’s coat button. This is the most common button found for South Carolina. The button’s pattern depicts a raised, “Leg Bone” numeral style number one. This variant is the thinner Style One. The high relief pattern is set on a plain field with a raised rim.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is missing.

 

2nd South Carolina Regiment 

 

1777-83 South Caroilversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O 1777-83 South Caroilversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1775-1780 2nd South Carolina Regiment

Color: An Earth Brown.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 25mm.
Troiani: A2SC.f.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This regiment was raised in Charlestown, South Carolina in 1775. Stationed at Charleston from 1775 to 1776, and then back in 1780. Served in Savanah and also had a detachment in Florida. This is the Large Size Enlisted man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts a raised, “SC” over an Arabic number, “2”. The high relief pattern is set on a plain field with a raised Double Concentric Ring edge border. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

Dug near the Estido River in January 2010.
The Bill Cross Collection. 

 

The 3rd South Carolina Regiment “The Liberty Caps”

     The 3rd South Carolina Regiment was first organized in the summer of 1775, as a “Mounted Rangers” infantry unit. These “Rangers” patrolled the backwoods and vast countryside of North Carolina. They were originally issued a blue uniform that sported a white face which had white metal buttons. To their Loyalist opponents they were known as, “The Liberty Caps.” This is because they wore an engraved cap plate that was inscribed, “Liberty or Death.” The officer’s were known to where gorgets that had an engraved Rattlesnake that was coiled and ready to strike. The 3rd South Carolina Regiment served in Charleston, South Carolina in 1775 to 1776, Savannah, Georgia, and the Southern Highlands. A detachment also fought against the Cherokee Indians in 1776. In 1778, the 3rd had operations in Florida. The regiment was captured by the British in South Carolina in May of 1780. 

 

1775 South Carolina Mounted Rangers 3rd Regt. 23.01mm Pewter Orig. Shank RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O 1775 South Carolina Mounted Rangers 3rd Regt. 23.01mm Pewter Orig. Shank RJ Silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1776-1781 3rd South Carolina Mounted Rangers 

Color: A Charcoal Gray.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 23.01mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This is a large size enlisted man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts a large Arabic number “3” in the center. The high relief pattern is set on a plain flat field. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank.

 

 

 

South Carolina 5th Regt Coat size A5SC.a No shank very rare o

1776-1780 5th South Carolina Regiment

Color: A Dark Pewtery Brown.
Metal: Pewter.
Size: 21mm. Coat Size.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, A Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Isabela’s Notes: This regiment served in Charlestown 1775-1776. There was a detachment in Savannah and Florida. Merged with the 1st Regt. in February 1780. This is the large size enlisted man’s coat button. The button’s pattern depicts a raised “S . C” above the Arabic number 5. A Double Concentric Ring Border around the periphery.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece casting for the reverse shank.