* GWI 20-A *
The Foliated Script
“GW” Monogram of Devine Sovereignty

* The GWI 20-A Foliated Script *
W/ Vertical Jesus Fish & “E” for Emmanuel

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This is a George Washington Button of Sovereignty

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 I would like to thank Gary Gianotti for the religious divinity “E” symbol research into
Scottish & British S
overeign relics.

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     GWI 20-A THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM: GWI 20-A.1 & .2 was engraved in a steel die hub and stamped in brass planchet with a Gilt finish.  The Size for GWI 20 A.1 & .2 is 25mm. GWI 20-A is a flat one-piece button with a soldered on loop shank. GWI 20- A.1 & .2 has an R-7 Rarity Rating with each of the two known Robert Scot & Francis Shallus dies. GWI 20-A is a religious sovereignty button which depicts an artistic foliated script “GW Monogram” in the center. The GW monogram’s curlicues notes the difference in steel dies between A.1 & A.2. GWI 20-A is the artistry engraving works of Robert Scot and Francis Shallus.

 

Scottish & English Devine Rights Symbol infused into George Washington’s Sovereignty

The Vesica Pisces or “Jesus Fish” symbol is used exclusively to denote Christianity. The symbol became significant to practicing Christians immediately after St. Augustine took the word from the acrostic prophecy of the Erythraean Sibyl. He perceptively applied the kabbalistic technique of notarikon to the word to reveal the meaning, “Jesus Christ, God’s son, savior.” If we bridge the intended engraved “E” symbol as European Royals did in their sovereign relics to GWI 20, it would represent George Washington’s right to rule or be President under God or God’s authority. The Vertical Jesus Fish is Robert Scot’s flowing allusion artistry technique linking to numeric value of God’s number 7 to George Washington. 

 

 

The Norman Saxon Symbol of Sovereignty, “E” 

Emmanuel or Imanu’el is a (Romanized) Hebrew name which appears in the book of Isaiah. The intent of the letter’s meaning is to be seen as a sign that God will protect the House of David. The symbol most likely began with Edward the Confessor and his divine right to rule over the people as king. He was the first to put forth that he was actually ordained by God, and circulated the belief that he had the power to heal the sick by his touch. The symbol “E” has been found on many Scottish and British sovereign relics relating to their king’s sovereignty, and also in their religious art over the last 950 years. Meaning, it was used as a character emblem denoting the divine right to rule under God and Jesus / Emmanuel (Sort of like a colophon imprint of an “E” denoting sovereignty by divinity). This symbol was also continued used by the lineage of Scotland’s House of Stuart. By placing this symbol on the GWI 20 button it infuses the divine authority that George Washington has the Judaeo-Christian divine right to rule under God (through/by means of) Jesus / Emmanuel.

O Come, O Come Emmanuel

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xtpJ4Q_Q-4

 

The Religious Base Number 3

Robert Scot and the Philadelphia artisans permeated and infused the number three, six, seven, and thirteen throughout foundations of the New Republic official symbols. The number 3 should be viewed as a base number which is a welcoming reflection because it is used by all the different cultures in the world. The number 3 is widely spread through a cultures societal customs in their (1) Rituals, (2) Practicing Arts, and (3) Religion. Meaning, the human species around the world unknowingly of each other links the base number 3 within their culture harmoniously as (1) Sacred (2) Mystical and (3) Devine. As an example for the corresponding number I parenthesized (3) we can say religious and divinity can be represented by Trinity, Triads, and Trios within their practicing faith. By implementing the Grand Architects Design based on the Great Architect of the Universe the Scottish Revolutionaries had incredible foresight because they understood that by linking the number 3 as a base number for a New Republic it could be powerful enough to tie the cultures of the world together through Washington in building a Nation.

The main idea of religious tolerance most probably originated (17th Century) in “part” by King James II of Scotland’s religious tolerance for his own subjects. His higher morality of decency provided an acceptance of diversity which is reflected within the principles of the Masonic Constitution. This most certainly was carried through into the 18th century Scottish Revolutionaries New Era of societal Idealisms through the Grand Architects Design.

If we add the lines together the numeric value is the representation of “7” (God)   

 

The Honey Comb Purity of God found as a base in All GWI Buttons.

For the esoteric researcher, here is a link to my paper on the Star of David:
www. georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com/the-religious-natureof-mans-symbols/ 

 

 

 

GWI 20-A.1 THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM

Color: A Dark Charcoal Patina W/ Earthy Light Green Encrustations in corrosion areas.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Engraved Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 23.49mm. Coat Size
Rarity: R-7
Variety Type: GWI 20-A, Floral Script GW Monogram.
Present Condition: A N. Carolina Dug Specimen, A Good Planchet Condition, A Strong Impression Remains.
Obverse Button Analysis: The button depicts a Foliated Script “GW” Monogram. The button still has has a nice deep strike remaining, and clearly shows all the inner foliated detail lines.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is still intact.

* This is a link to the U.S. National Archives showing that on June 16th 1783, Robert Scot signed a commissioned receipt for an official engraved seal to James Madison as, “Rot Scot.” His style signature is also demonstrated within GWI 20’s engraver’s mark. The “FS” would be Francis Shallus engravers signature. As found in other shared relics Robert Scot & Francis Shallus always share the “S.”   https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/01-07-02-0090  

A. “E” for Emmanuel for Washington’s Divine Authority. * B. Engravers signature’s of Robert Scot & Francis Shallus.

                                  

Library Records Has Limited Information WI 20 A-1:
History:         Yes            Recorded Sales Price:  Yes

Current Button Owner and Location: New Windsor, New York

The RJ. Silverstein’s Isabela Collection.
This button was dug by J. Scott in North Carolina on January 10th 2018

 

 

GWI 20-A.1 THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM

Color: A Chocolate Patina, with a Hint of Gilt in the Monogram’s Engraving.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Engraved Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 25mm. Coat size
Rarity: R-7
Variety Type: GWI 20-A, Floral Script GW Monogram.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong Impression Remains.
Obverse Button Analysis: This button’s charm comes from it’s wonderful chocolate patina and it’s elegant floral script. The planchet is solid with no minimal signs of metal fatigue. The surface has a nice even chocolate patina throughout. There are no harsh scratches or abrasions on the surface that effect the design. The only metal deterioration is the micro porosity around the edge. The Foliated Script “GW” Monogram has a nice deep strike, and clearly shows all the inner foliated detail lines. The Floral Swirl with the Accenting Petals is nicely impressed, and shows strong fluid lines. This is a wonderful example, and would make a crown jewel in anyone’s George Washington inaugural button collection. *If you own this button, or one like it, please contact the web site librarian so i can get some past history and location.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is reportedly original, straight and intact. The reverse is also reported by seller to be clean with no harsh scratches or abrasions.

Library Records Has Limited Information WI 20 A-2:
History:         Yes          Recorded Sales Price:    Yes

Current Button Owner and Location:                  No

 

 

GWI 20-A.2 THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM

Color: A Milk Chocolate With Yellow Undertones & Green Encrustations.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Engraved Design, Gilt Brass.
Size: 24mm. Coat Size
Rarity: R-7
Variety Type: Type-A, Foliated Script GW.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong Impression Remains.
Variety Type:
GWI 20-A, Floral Script GW Monogram.

Obverse Button Analysis: A very nice addition for the visitors pleasure when they visit George Washington’s home in Virginia. The planchet is solid and flat with no metal fatigue or deterioration. The obverse shows a smooth surface without any harsh scratches or abrasions. The Foliated Script “GW” Monogram has a nice deep strike, and the green color accents all the inner foliated detail lines. The Floral Swirl with the Accenting Petals has a nice deep impression, and shows strong fluid lines. This is a wonderful specimen, and a welcome in Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens Collection.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight and intact. The reverse is reported to be clean with no harsh scratches or abrasions.

Library Records Has Limited Information WI 20 A-2:
History:       Yes          Recorded Sales Price:  Yes

Current Button Owner and Location:     ~ Virginia ~

Mount Vernon Collection
Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens

 

 

 

The 1792 GW Script Monogram Cuff

GWI 20-B.1, .2, .3, .4 Die Variants
Soft & Hard White Metal 18.07mm Cuff W/ Tombac Reverse

After carefully studying GWI 20-A, and demonstrating how Robert Scot infused the “E” for Emmanuel (Jesus) and other sovereignty meanings within the engraving of GWI 20-A coat size button, we were able to conclude that GWI 20-B cuff variant was not the signature works of Robert Scot 1789-97 Philadelphia team of engravers.

GWI 20-B cuff variant’s GW Monogram design shows there was 4 different patterns. There could be more, but none have surfaced at this time. One pattern was made in a soft white pewter planchet and displays a raised backmark with a copper or iron loop in a tombac style shank. The other soft white pewter pattern has what appears to be rings from a lathe. This button also has a copper or wire loop set in a tombac style hub. The other two monogram patterns were engraved in a hard white pewter with no backmarks and showed the same style shank. I believe GWI 20-B was made in 1792/3 for George Washington’s second inaugural celebration. I was the first one to buy a specimen in recent times from Heritage Auctions in 2012, and since my purchase three others appeared on the market and sold through the same auction house. Did I foolishly spend $2,987.50 knowing this is not the work of Francis Shallus and Robert Scot? Well, for the people that follow our work into the hidden symbology of Specific GWI buttons, I will provide my thinking into why I purchased this cuff GWI button variant even though this was NOT made by Robert Scot or any of his Philadelphia engravers.

The Reverse / Obverse:

Robert Milburn told me that the Grilley family in Connecticut learned how to construct Tombac Reverses from an English immigrant in Boston, and started using this style tombac reverse in the 1790s. George Washington inaugural celebratory buttons were made from 1789 to approximately 1793 (No inaugural celebratory buttons were made for John Adams). So, if GWI 20-B’s reverse tombac style is of British origin it could predate any American produced civilian buttons by 10-15 years. Meaning, if GWI 20-B specimens using this style reverse, and manor of monogram engraving were found in England this style inaugural button would be justified to being an authentic period inaugural button made for 1789 or in 1792/3. But none have ever appeared in England.

When I bought my specimen in December of 2012, I was able to confirm that the first appearance of GWI 20-B occurred thirty or so ago when Massachusetts auctioneer Ben Corning sold two examples. So, this is good news for people who might have suspicion that this is a contemporary forgery. This would date before a time where laser technological advances were able to produce this style of inaugural button. Bad news is that it does not allow me to tightly date the button into the celebratory time frame of 1789-97 period. Knowing this is not the signature engraving work of Robert Scot or Francis Shallus’s GWI 20-A, I was confounded with the possibility of this button being an 1801 Anniversary issue of the 1776 25th Anniversary. Also, I do not like the fact that no specimens were ever dug as is all other GWI varieties have been.  

Complexity of Facts: 

Dale mentioned to me in written conversation his feeling was that these buttons were hand engraved and not mechanically engraved. If GWI 20-B was constructed by a mechanical process then every button would look exactly the same in the engraving flow of the GW Monogram. To rule out that different manufacturers made these variants there isn’t enough of these specimens in circulation to show mass production of this mechanically engraved variant. I also know that pewter designs in this era were molded and not engraved. In J. Harold Cobb’s George Washington Buttons & Medalets he does reference on page 10 rare coat size (34mm.) “Unauthenticated Pewter & Tombac Style” inaugural buttons, but not of this particular GWI 20 variety. To my knowledge all George Washington inaugural and New Nation Tribute buttons were made of copper or brass planchets. Meaning, none were known to be pewter molded. Taking with Betty K. about hard white buttons she gave me a stronger insight into the planchet manufacturer’s variations in who could have made soft & hard white buttons in the late 18th century. I know Mix Barney & Co manufactured “hard white” pewter buttons in New Haven, CT in the 1780’s & 1790’s. This could account for some of the GWI 20-B variants sold after mine, but not my GWI 20-B. My specimen displays a jagged edge and a worn down backmark which suggests a softer pewter mix then the Naugatuck hard whites. As noted in my metallurgy section in the top link, when we add zinc to copper it makes brass. In the delicate balance of metallurgy mixing if you add 60 per cent zinc the color becomes white. Betty K. also mentioned to me that tombac or German brass was cast, and if they added arsenic it became white tombac which is much harder than hard white pewter but still capable of being engraved. I did like the shanks displayed on all the GWI specimens sold. All appear to have copper or Iron embedded in the hump. Leave unfinished Draft 3-10-18.

 

GWI 20-B.1 THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM

Color: Midnight Grey With An Inner Charcoal Color Within The Design
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Engraved Design, Soft White Pewter.
Size: 18.07mm. Cuff size
Rarity: R-5
Variety Type: GWI 20-B.1, Soft White Pewter, Raised Backmark.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, Strong Engraved Impressions Remains.
Obverse Button Analysis:
This specimen has an elegant design quality that commemorates George Washington with an ornamental fluidity of high society. The button depicts a script GW Monogram pattern in a soft white pewter metal surface. 

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a tombac style iron loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

Library Records Has Limited Information GWI 20-B.1:
History:     Yes          Recorded Sales Price:   Yes
Current Button Owner and Location: ~ New York ~

The RJ. Silverstein’s Isabela Collection.~ 

 

 

GWI 20-B.1 THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM

Color: Midnight Grey With An Inner Charcoal Color Within The Design
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Engraved Design, Soft White Pewter.
Size: 18.07mm. Cuff size
Rarity: R-5
Variety Type: GWI 20-B.2, Soft White Pewter, Lathe Reverse.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, Strong Engraved Impressions Remains.
Obverse Button Analysis:
  This button depicts a script GW Monogram in a soft white pewter metal surface. Lathe reverse.

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a tombac style iron loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. Lathe reverse. 

Library Records Has Limited Information GWI 20-B.2:
History:     Yes          Recorded Sales Price:   Yes
Current Button Owner and Location: ~ New York ~

 

 

GWI 20-B.3 THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM

Color: Dusk Grey, with Silvery Black Inner Design.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Incuse Engraved Design, Hard White Pewter.
Size: 19mm. Cuff Size
Rarity: R-5
Variety Type: GWI 20-B.3, Hard White Pewter
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, Strong Engraved Impression Remains.
Obverse Button Analysis:
This button has a nice original aged Pewter tone. Unlike the other example pictured above, this one has a slightly pattern for the Foliated Script “GW” Monogram. Almost like a double die version of the former, and also the swirl off the “W” is more hooked around. 

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a tombac style iron loop shank. The shank was reported as a replacement shank by H.A. auctions.

Library Records Has Limited Information GWI 20-B.3
History:      Yes          Recorded Sales Price:   Yes
Current Button Owner and Location:   Unclaimed

 

 

GWI 20-B.4 THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM

Color: Dusk Grey, with Silvery Black Inner Design.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Engraved Design, Hard White Pewter.
Size: 19mm. Cuff Size.
Rarity: R-5
Variety Type: GWI 20-B, Hard White Pewter.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, Strong Engraved Impression Remains.
Obverse Button Analysis: Unlike the other 3 specimens GW monogram patterns pictured above, this one has a slightly different style for the Foliated Script “GW” Monogram
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a Tombac Style loop Shank. This shank is original, straight, and intact. The surface appears to be smooth and clean, with maybe a minor scuff mark.

Library Records Has Limited Information GWI B.4:
History:      Yes         Recorded Sales Price:  Yes

Current Button Owner and Location: Unclaimed

 

 

 

GWI 20-B.4 THE FOLIATED SCRIPT “GW” MONOGRAM

Color: A Pewter Gray With a Light Dusty Brown covering, with A Black Design.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Engraved Design, Hard White Pewter.
Size: 19mm. Cuff Size.
Rarity: R-5
Variety Type: GWI 20-B.4, Hard White Pewter.
Present Condition: A Non Dug Specimen, A Strong Planchet Condition, Strong Engraved Impressions.
Obverse Button Analysis:
 This button is the same variant as the one above, but a better preservation of the button’s surfaces. 

Reverse Button Analysis: This flat one-piece button with a Tombac Style loop shank. The shank is reported to be replaced, but straight and intact. There are a few minor scuffs which mar the surface, and also what appears to be a heat scorch from the shank replacement. Otherwise smooth and flat.

Library Records Has Limited Information GWI 20-B.4
History:       Yes          Recorded Sales Price:  Yes

Current Button Owner and Location:  Unclaimed