1775 – 1783
American Tory
British Crown Loyalist

British Crown Loyalists in the American Colonies

~ 1775-1776 South Carolina Dragoons ~ 

 

     A “Loyalist” was a name used by the American Patriots for the colonists who kept their allegiance to the British Empire during the American Revolution. The American Patriots who took up the cause used many names to distinguish their counterparts: Royalists, Tories, Loyalists, or King’s men. The Loyalist Corps was an untrained military body of volunteer colonists who showed their allegiance to the Crown by forming a militia that was sanctioned by the Crown outside of the regular British Army. There were more then a 150 military units raised by colonial Loyalists during the Revolutionary War. In the southern colonies there was twenty-six known Loyalist units that fought in southern campaigns along side, or in concert with British regulars. Below is a sample of buttons that were used by Loyalist units that operated in concert with the regular British Army. Also, there were some extra unissued British uniforms were made available to American Loyalists in need of uniforms. Records indicate that in October of 1778, unissued British uniform coats kept in store-houses went to the Loyalist volunteers. The coats sported the button numbers of the 10th, 45th, and 52nd Regt. of Foot. So, any findings of these numbers on post-1778 Rev War sites might have belonged to Loyalist troops. 

 

 

 

10 Reg of Foot 18mm Pewter excav. kieth nixon in carolinas in 2007

Post 1778 Loyalist 10th Regiment of Foot Cuff Button
(British Regt of Foot used this button from 1768-1778)



Color: A Charcoal Brown Mix.

Metal: 1-Piece, Slightly Convex, Incuse Design, Cast Pewter.

Size: 17mm. Cuff Size
Troiani:B10.d
Present Condition:
An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong Impression Remains.
Robert’s Notes: Since we do not know exactly which campaigns the Loyalists accompanied the drafted regiments or when they were on their own, I am just going to list what is noted in history with the 10th Regt. of Foot. This is the enlisted man’s pattern. The button’s pattern depicts an incuse Arabic number “10”  in the center on a plain field with no edge border. In October of 1774, the 10th regiment of foot was sent to Boston. They served in a regiment and in detachments at Bunker Hill, Lexington-Concord, and then in the New York Campaign in 1776. In 1777, on to the Philadelphia campaign, and then home to England in october of 1777. Enlisted men were drafted into other regiments. This is probably when the British regulars had the willingness to give the Loyalists the unused coats from store houses. The 10th Regt. of Foot was later titled the “North Lincolnshire Regiment in 1782.

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The loop shank is broken off of the boss.

Library Records Has Limited Information on RoF-10:
History:        Yes                Recorded Sales Price:       Yes
Current Button Owner and Location: ~ South Carolina ~

The K. Nixon Collection.
Excavated in Beaufort County, South Carolina 2007~

 

 

 

 

1780 Royal Provincials Pewter Dug near Monck's Corners Area near Charleston S.C. georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1780 Royal Provincials Pewter Dug near Monck's Corners Area near Charleston S.C. georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R copy

1780 ROYAL PROVINCIAL LOYALIST BUTTON



Color: A Two-Tone Brown with Orange Flair.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Copper.

Size: 16.61mm.
 Cuff Size.
Rarity: R-7 (With this Border Variation)
Troiani:LRP.q (Book Specimen)
Condition:
An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.


Robert’s Notes: This button is most likely an enlisted man’s large size coat button. The button’s pattern depicts a small crown over the initials, “RP”. The high relief pattern is set on a flat plain field with a raised border edge. One theory put forth is that these “RP” buttons did not exist before 1780. We do know by records that British loyalists used plain white metal buttons that were sent from England as early as 1776 for their Loyalist Troops. I am told by Don T. that this is an extremely rare type of Royal Provincial pattern, because it has a raised border. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.



Reverse Button Analysis: The Boss is still present, and the Iron loop shank is intact.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-1:
History:         Yes               Recorded Sales Price:    Yes
Current Button Owner and Location:  ~ New York ~

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.
Excavated near Monck’s Corners Charleston, South Carolina.

Notes: There are only two known patterns to exist for an officer’s “Royal Provincial” button. The first is a 22mm. gilded Copper Repousse with a wood back. This was made for the Royal North Carolina Volunteers. This type has never been excavated, but examples have been found on period uniform jacket that dated around 1782-3. The second, is a 22mm. gilded one-piece copper button with a loop shank. This pattern has a raised Crown with flowers and thistles above the above foliated or script letters “RPV” (Royal Provincial Volunteers). There have been a few recovered specimens of this type from South Carolina, but again this was probably not commonly used.

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Provincials 20mm Pewter RP excav. stono river, south carolina Ebay $385. nov 13, 2012 R 76.1-rRoyal Provincials 20mm Pewter RP excav. stono river, south carolina Ebay $385. nov 13, 2012 R 76.1

 

1780-83 ROYAL PROVINCIAL LOYALIST BUTTON



Color: Gun Metal Gray.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Copper.

Size: 22mm.

Rarity: R-5
Troiani:LRP.k / Size Variant
Condition:
An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.


Robert’s Notes: This button is the enlisted man’s large size coat button. The button’s pattern depicts a small crown over the initials, “RP”. The high relief pattern is set on a flat plain field with a flat edge. One theory put forth is that these “RP” buttons did not exist before 1780. We do know by records that British loyalists used plain white metal buttons that were sent over from England as early as 1776 for their Loyalist Troops.

Reverse Button Analysis: This appears to be a one-piece casting for the Reverse Shank. The shank appears to be squared off, as some kind of transitional or experimental type for the period.

Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-2:

History:            Yes           Recorded Sales Price:   Yes

Current Button Owner and Location: ~ New York ~

Excavated in Stono River South Carolina.

 

 

 

1780 Royal Provincial 22mm copper orig shank rj silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbutton.com o1780 Royal Provincial 22mm copper orig shank rj silversteins georgewashingtoninauguralbutton.com r

1780-83 ROYAL PROVINCIAL LOYALIST BUTTON



Color: A Metal Brown with Orange Flair.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Copper. 

Size: 22.78mm. 

Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert’s Notes: This button is the enlisted man’s large size coat button. The button’s pattern depicts a small crown over the initials, “RP”. The high relief pattern is set on a flat plain field with a flat edge. One theory put forth is that these “RP” buttons did not exist before 1780. We do know by records that British loyalists used plain white metal buttons that were sent over from England as early as 1776 for their Loyalist Troops.

Reverse Button Analysis: This appears to be a One-Piece Casting for the Reverse Shank. The Shank appears to be squared off, as some kind of transitional or experimental type for the period.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-3:

History:              Yes        Recorded Sales Price:     Yes

Current Button Owner and Location: ~ New York ~

The RJ. Silverstein Collection.


Excavated in St. Augustine Florida.

 

 

 

 

1770’s Loyalist, South Carolina Mounted Unit

Color: A Hershey’s Chocolate Brown With Olive Undertones.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Copper.
Size: 28.5mm.
Troiani’s: ADSC.a Mine is Book Example.
Present Condition: A Dug Specimen, A Good Planchet Condition Remains, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: My latest theory is that this button belonged to a South Carolina British Loyalist either Dragoon’s or some kind of British related-Mounted Cavalry unit. Most likely an Officer using it as a field wear metal button. The loyalist in South Carolina were known to have had a light cavalry units, as well as an infantry unit. Probably, one of those pompous British assholes with grand illusion of military authority over the colonists. Collector’s should note, i have seen specimens with the same pattern on a convex field that were found in England. These have been tightly dated to the same time period. The button’s pattern depicts a Dragoon’s symbol of a Mounted Rider with a Drawn Saber. The horse is depicted as Charging upon a grassy mound. The high relief pattern is set on a flat stippled field with a deep channel in the legend.

     Since the fall 2010, several copper and pewter specimens have surfaced from metal detector enthusiasts. Meaning, this pattern was used more wide spread then just the southern colonies. Confirmation from dig finds come from England, Canada, and the American Colonies. No un-dug Specimens are known to exist, or painted portraits of officer’s with this uniform pattern.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a flat one-piece button with a loop shank. The Boss is still present, but the loop shank is unfortunately broken off.

Excavated in South Carolina .~
The RJ. Silverstein Collection.

 

 

 

1770's NY Loyalist No Shank georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com O1770's NY Loyalist No Shank georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com R

1770’s NEW YORK LOYALIST BUTTON?



Color: Silvery Brown.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Cast Pewter.

Size: 21.77mm. Coat Size.

Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Fair Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert’s Notes: This could be a another variation of a New York Volunteers. The sellers said this was a loyalist button in the listing, but unclear if factual. The font is reminiscent of the style used in that era, but again this could just be a button from around the later 18th century. There is no recorded documentation that this was ever worn by loyalists during the war. The button’s pattern depicts New York raised initials in the center of a decorative ring. The high relief pattern is set on a flat plain field with no edge border.

Reverse Button Analysis: The Boss is still present, but the loop shank is missing.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-5:

History:      Yes              Recorded Sales Price:      Yes

Current Button Owner and Location:  ~ New York ~

 

 

 

 

King's Dragoons 2nd American Regiment. Pewter 22mm george washington inaugural buttons O

THE VOLUNTEERS of IRELAND (2ND AMERICAN REGIMENT) 1782-83
1782 Re-named “The Kings Irish Regiment” & Designated 105th Regiment of Foot

Color: Pewter Grey with Black.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Pewter.
Size: 22mm.
Troiani:
 LVI.c
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert’s Notes: This is the large size enlisted man’s pattern. The pattern has a high relief Crown over the mounted onto of a raised circle. There is a raised Arabic number “2” centered on a plain field. The word American is arced in the legend underneath. The regiment was formed in New York and Philadelphia in May of 1778. They had some action in Virginia, King’s Ferry, and Stony Point New York. Went to Charleston South Carolina in 1780, with a battle in Hobkirk’s Hill and Camden. Also had a Garrison stationed at Camden in 1781. In 1782, they had a raid on Santee. In 1779, they were recommended to be named 2nd American Regiment, but the designation didn’t take place until 1782. Later in that same year, they were re-designated 105th regiment of Foot, and re-named, “The King’s Irish Regiment”.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is reportedly intact.

Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-6:
History:        Yes              Recorded Sales Price:     Yes
Current Button Owner and Location: ~ New York ~

 

 

 

British Loyalist for the New York Volunteers. Officers Button georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com

1777 NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS BUTTON:



Color: A Flat Gold with Brown.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Gilt Copper.
Size: 22mm. Coat Size.
Troiani:
 LNYV.aa (Book Specimen)
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert’s Notes: This is recorded as an officers pattern, possibly the 2nd one introduced. The button’s pattern depicts the initials for New York Volunteers, “N Y over V” in raised letters on a plain field. Circling the initials is an ornamental circle with ribbon bows on the side and below. The button’s edge border appears reeded. 

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is reportedly original, straight, and intact.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-7:

History:        Yes            Recorded Sales Price:        No

Current Button Owner and Location: ~ Connecticut ~



The Don Troiani Collection.
Dug near Ogdensburg, New York.

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS * 3rd AMERICAN REGIMENT

Color: A Silvery Green.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Cast Pewter.
Size: 22mm.
Troiani:
 LNYV.d
Present Condition:
An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert’s Notes: This is the large size enlisted man’s coat button. The pattern has a high relief design of a crown over the Arabic number “3” that is within a concentric ring. The word American is in raised lettering in the legend underneath. Originally, this regiment was raised as two companies in Nova Scotia in 1776, and then went on to fight in the New York Campaign. In 1777, they expanded to a battalion, and had a detachment at the battle of Forts Clinton and Montgomery. In the fall of 1778, they moved down to East Florida. They joined in the fight at the siege of Savannah in September of 1779, and then went to Charleston, S.C. in the spring of 1780. In the summer of 1782, they returned to New York. They officially were designated the 3rd American Regiment on May 2, 1779.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is reportedly intact.

Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-8:
History:           Yes             Recorded Sales Price:       No
Current Button Owner and Location:                       No

 

 

LOYALIST BUTTON CHRIS FINDYMANS KINGS AMERICAN REGIMENT OFFICERS LB-13 GILT 25. copy

 1776-1781 THE KING’S AMERICAN REGIMENT



Color: White Gold Face with Gold Inlay.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Incised Design With Raised Stipples, Gilded Brass.

Size: 25mm.
 Coat Size.
Troiani: LKAR.a

Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional Impression Remains.
Robert’s Notes: The design has a Small Size decorative Crown incised on a plain center field. Inside the crown is a Rose, Heart, and Cross with another small Catholic Cross surmounting the top. Circling around the crown is a double row of High Relief Stipples that is set on a stipple base inside of a channel. Circling around the border is the units designation, “The . Kings . American . Regiment”. This is incised in all Roman font capital letters. There is also four high relief Separation Dots in-between each word. This type of officer’s button was designed and made with the highest quality of manufacturing available at the time. They were usually made of gilded brass, and had Samuel Firmin’s “SF” backmark. This regiment was originally raised as a New York garrison in 1777, and was called, The Associated Refugees”. They were stationed in several places in New York including, Flatbush, Flushing, and Kings Bridge. Their early campaigns included the attacks on Forts Clinton and Montgomery in the Hudson Valley, and in 1778, they joined part of the Rhode Island Garrison; and participated in the raid on Nantucket. Afterwards they returned back to New York in 1779. In 1780, they went to Virginia, and then onto Charleston, South Carolina. Afterwards they went onto Savannah, and had several operations in Georgia and Florida. They were titled the 4th American Regiment in 1781. The regiment was officially disbanded in 1784. 

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a One-Piece Casting for the Reverse Shank. 



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-9:
History:      Yes     Recorded Sales Price: Not for Sale
Current Button Owner and Location:     ~ Canada ~



The P.E.I. Collection.

Notes: The Original Buttons were Gold with White Faces, and then after 1778 they changed to Gold with Olive Green or Blue Faces.

 

 

 

 

Kings Regiment cuff button bought out of Canada Dales ButtonKings Regiment cuff button bought out of Canada rj silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com r

1776-1781 THE KING’S AMERICAN REGIMENT



Color: Charcoal Gray Face with Gold Inlay.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, High Relief Design, Gilt Brass.

Size: 15.25mm Cuff Size.

Troiani: LKAR.a/Variation

Present Condition: An Excavated Example, GoodPlanchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert’s Notes: This rough example which shows major edge loss and chipping comes out of lower Canada. Unlike the coat size buttons, this die variant’s patten is in high relief pattern instead of incised. This button’s design has a medium size high relief  Crown on the center of a plain field. Within the crown is a Heart, Cross, and Rose. Circling around the crown is a Double Row of high relief Stipples. Circling around the border is the unit’s designation, “The . Kings . American . Regt.” in all high relief Roman font capital letters. There is four high relief Dots in-between each word which could signify an old style European Cross. This type of officer’s button was designed and made with the highest quality of manufacturing available at the time. These buttons were made of gilt brass, and some of the coat size specimens even showed Samuel Firmin’s “SF” backmark. This regiment was originally raised as a New York garrison in 1777, and was called, “The Associated Refugees.” They were stationed in several places in New York including, Flatbush, Flushing, and Kings Bridge. Their early campaigns included the attacks on Forts Clinton and Montgomery in the Hudson Valley New York, and in 1778, they joined part of the Rhode Island Garrison; which participated in the raid on Nantucket. Afterwards they returned back to New York in 1779. In 1780, they went to Virginia, and then onto Charleston, South Carolina. Afterwards they went onto Savannah, and had several operations in Georgia and Florida. They were titled the 4th American Regiment in 1781. The regiment was officially disbanded in 1784.

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece with a loop shank for the reverse. The shank is originals, straight, and intact.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-10:

History:         Yes             Recorded Sales Price:    Yes

Current Button Owner and Location: ~ Earth ~



The Dale Collection.~
Dug in Canada.

 

 

 

 

1778 King's American 4th Regiment 15.89mm Gilt brass georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com BCL-81778 King's American 4th Regiment 15.89mm Gilt brass georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com BCL-8r

1776-1781 THE KING’S AMERICAN REGIMENT



Color: Charcoal Gray Face with Gold Inlay.
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, High Relief Design, Gilt Brass.

Size: 15.89mm Cuff Size.
Troiani: LKAR.a/Variation

Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert’s Notes: This is the small cuff size officer’s button for the King’s American Regiment. Unlike the coat die variants, this patten is in high relief instead of incised. This button’s design has a medium size high relief Crown on the center of a plain field. Within the crown is a Heart, Cross, and Rose. Circling around the crown is a Double Row of high relief Stipples. Circling around the border is the unit’s designation, “The . Kings . American . Regt.” in all high relief Roman font capital letters. There is four high relief Dots in-between each word which could signify an old style European Cross.This type of officer’s button was designed and made with the highest quality of manufacturing available at the time. These buttons were made of gilt brass, and some of the coat size specimens even showed Samuel Firmin’s “SF” backmark. This regiment was originally raised as a New York garrison in 1777, and was called, “The Associated Refugees.” They were stationed in several places in New York including, Flatbush, Flushing, and Kings Bridge. Their early campaigns included the attacks on Forts Clinton and Montgomery in the Hudson Valley New York, and in 1778, they joined part of the Rhode Island Garrison; which participated in the raid on Nantucket. Afterwards they returned back to New York in 1779. In 1780, they went to Virginia, and then onto Charleston, South Carolina. Afterwards they went onto Savannah, and had several operations in Georgia and Florida. They were titled the 4th American Regiment in 1781. The regiment was officially disbanded in 1784.

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece with a loop shank for the reverse. The shank is original, straight, and intact. 



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-11:

History:           Yes       Recorded Sales Price:         Yes

Current Button Owner and Location: ~ New York ~



The RJ. Silverstein Collection.
Dug in Moncks Corners, South Carolina

 

 

 

 

1776 Kings 4th Regiment Chris Findy Man 2001 rj silversteins george washington inaugural buttons BCL-81776 Kings 4th Regiment Chris Findy Man 2001 rj silversteins george washington inaugural buttons BCL-8r

1776-81 THE KING’S AMERICAN REGIMENT
They were titled the 4th American Regiment in 1781



Color: Yellow Gold With Purple/Blue Face.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Incised Design With Raised Stipples, Gilt Brass.

Size: 25mm.
 Coat Size Button
Troiani: LKAR.a/Variation
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional Impression Remains.
Robert’s Notes: The design has a Small Size decorative Crown incised on a plain center field. Inside the crown is a Rose, Heart, and Cross with another small Catholic Cross surmounting the top. Circling around the crown is a double row of High Relief Stipples that is set inside of a channel. Circling around the border is the units designation, “The. Kings. American. Regiment“. This is engraved in all Roman font capital letters. There is also four high relief Separation Dots in-between each word. This type of officer’s button was designed and made with the highest quality of manufacturing available at the time. They were usually made of gilded brass, and had Samuel Firmin’s “SF” backmark. This regiment was originally raised as a New York garrison in 1777, and was called, “The Associated Refugees.” They were stationed in several places in New York including, Flatbush, Flushing, and Kings Bridge. Their early campaigns included the attacks on Forts Clinton and Montgomery in the Hudson Valley, and in 1778, they joined part of the Rhode Island Garrison; and participated in the raid on Nantucket. Afterwards they returned back to New York in 1779. In 1780, they went to Virginia, and then onto Charleston, South Carolina. Afterwards they went onto Savannah, and had several operations in Georgia and Florida. They were titled the 4th American Regiment in 1781. The regiment was officially disbanded in 1784.

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a One-Piece Casting for the Reverse Shank. The shank is original straight, and intact.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-12:

History:      Yes   Recorded Sales Price:   Not for Sale
Current Button Owner and Location:    ~ Canada ~



Chris, Prince Edward Island Collection.
Notes: In 1778 the buttons changed to Gold with Blue & Green Faces.

 

 

 

 

merican 1778 Kings 4th Regt. RJ SILVERSTEINS GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM BCL-11merican 1778 Kings 4th Regt. RJ SILVERSTEINS GEORGEWASHINGTONINAUGURALBUTTONS.COM BCL-11 r

1776-1781 THE KING’S AMERICAN REGIMENT



Color: Marble Green With Gold Highlights.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Incised Design With Raised Stipples, Gilt Brass.

Size: 25mm.
 Coat Size Button
Troiani: LKAR.a
Present Condition:
An Excavated Specimen, Exceptional Planchet Condition, An Exceptional Impression Remains.


Robert’s Notes: The design has a Medium Size decorative Crown incised inside on plain center field. Inside the crown is a Rose, Heart, and Cross with another small Catholic Cross surmounting the top. Circling around the crown is a double row of High Relief Stipples that is set inside of a channel. Circling around the border is the units designation, “The. Kings. American. Regiment“. This is engraved in all Roman font capital letters. There is also four high relief  Separation Dots in-between each word. This type of officer’s button was designed and made with the highest quality of manufacturing available at the time. They were usually made of gilded brass, and had Samuel Firmin’s “SF” backmark. This regiment was originally raised as a New York garrison in 1777, and was called, “The Associated Refugees.” They were stationed in several places in New York including, Flatbush, Flushing, and Kings Bridge. Their early campaigns included the attacks on Forts Clinton and Montgomery in the Hudson Valley, and in 1778, they joined part of the Rhode Island Garrison; and participated in the raid on Nantucket. Afterwards they returned back to New York in 1779. In 1780, they went to Virginia, and then onto Charleston, South Carolina. Afterwards they went onto Savannah, and had several operations in Georgia and Florida. They were titled the 4th American Regiment in 1781. The regiment was officially disbanded in 1784.

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a One-Piece Casting for the Reverse Shank. The shank is original straight, and intact.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-13:

History:       Yes       Recorded Sales Price:  Not for Sale
Current Button Owner and Location:      ~ Canada ~



Chris, Prince Edward Island Collection.~
Notes: In 1778 the buttons changed to Gold with Blue or Green Faces.

 

 

 

 

Kings American 4th Regiment 1770's Gilt Brass 23mm orig shank oKings American 4th Regiment 1770's Gilt Brass 23mm orig shank r

1781-1783 KINGS AMERICAN REGIMENT * 4TH AMERICAN REGT.

Color: Earth Brown with Gilt Highlights.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Incised Design, Gilded Brass.

Size: 25mm. 
Coat Size
Troiani: LKAR.e
Present Condition:
An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong Impression Remains.

Robert’s Notes: In March of 1781, the King’s American Regiment was re-titled of The Kings 4th American Regiment. Officers heavily gilded buttons with SF backmarks. Enlisted men were presumed to wear regular “RP” buttons. This officer’s button has a Large English Tudor Rose incised in the center with an Arabic incuse number “4” surrounded by a Reeded Circle. The units designation, “The . Kings. American. Regiment” circles around the outside with a small Tudor Rose depicted at the bottom. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original straight, and intact. SF backmark present.

Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-14:

History:               Yes              Recorded Sales Price:   Yes
Current Button Owner and Location:        ~ No ~ 

 

 

 

 

1776 Queens Rangers 1st American RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com BCL-131776 Queens Rangers 1st American RJ Silverstein's georgewashingtoninauguralbuttons.com BCL-13r

1776 QUEEN’S RANGERS *1st AMERICAN

Color: A Silvery Brown.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Silvered.

Size: 16mm. 
Cuff Size
Troiani: LQR.h

Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Poor Planchet Condition, A Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert‘s Notes: This is the small size Officer or Sergeants repousse button. The pattern has a high relief design of a crown over the Arabic number “1”. The word, “American” is in raised lettering in the bottom legend set in-between two raised concentric ring. This unit was originally known as the Queen’s Rangers (1st American). Officially raised in New York in August 1776, and fought in various campaigns including Philadelphia in 1777, including the battles at Brandywine and Germantown. In 1778, they retreated through New Jersey and were involved at Monmouth Court House. On May 2, 1779, part of the unit merged into the King’s American Dragoons stationed in New York. This is where it was officially designated as the 1st American Regiment. There next battle was in Springfield, New Jersey in June 1780, and then onto Virginia in 1781, with the capture of most of the regiment at Yorktown. The remainder of the regiment wintered in Hallet’s Cove Long island in 1781-82. Except for a small detachment that was sent down to the Carolinas. To date, the 1st American button has only been found in a small size. The larger buttons were never manufactured for the enlisted men.

Reverse Button Analysis: The Boss is still present, but the loop shank is missing.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-15-A:

History:       Yes             Recorded Sales Price:     Yes

Current Button Owner and Location:                No

 

 

 

 

1779 Kings 1st American Loyalist Button 16.45mm Pewter robert silversteins loyalist BCL-141779 Kings 1st American Loyalist Button 16.45mm Pewter robert silversteins loyalist BCL-14r

1776 QUEENS RANGERS * 1st AMERICAN REGIMENT

Color: A Flat Grayish Black.
Metal: Slightly Convex, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Pewter.
Size: 16mm.
Troiani: LQR.b
Present Condition:
An Excavated Example, Fair Planchet, A Poor High Relief Pattern Remains.

Isabela’s Notes: This is the small size Officer or Sergeant’s pattern for vest or cuff button. The pattern has a high relief design of a crown over the Arabic number “1”. The word, “American” is in raised lettering in the bottom channel set in-between two raised concentric ring. This unit was originally known as the Queen’s Rangers (1st American). Officially raised in New York in August 1776, and fought in various campaigns including Philadelphia in 1777, including the battles at Brandywine and Germantown. In 1778, they retreated through New Jersey and were involved at Monmouth Court House. On May 2, 1779, part of the unit merged into the King’s American Dragoons stationed in New York. This is where it was officially designated as the 1st American Regiment. There next battle was in Springfield, New Jersey in June 1780, and then onto Virginia in 1781, with the capture of most of the regiment at Yorktown. The remainder of the regiment wintered in Hallet’s Cove Long island in 1781-82. Except for a small detachment that was sent down to the Carolinas. To date, the 1st American button has only been found in a small size. The larger buttons were never manufactured for the enlisted men.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The Boss is still present, but the loop shank is missing.

Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-15-B:
History:         Yes          Recorded Sales Price:        Yes
Current Button Owner and Location: ~ New York ~

The Isabela Collection.
Dug in New York.

 

1777-1778 BUTLERS RANGERS                                             

Color: A Flat Gray With Orange Encrustations.                                                                  
Metal: Slightly Convex, 1-Piece, Raised Letters, CastPewter.
Size: 24mm.
Troiani: LBR.e
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: These Rangers were formed in Canada in 1777-78. They were based on a lake in Niagara and were involved in concert with Indians in mostly frontier raids. Detachments were active across most of the Canadian frontier including Niagara, Pittsburgh-Wheeling area, Detroit, and Kentucky. This button is the large enlisted man’s pattern. 
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The loop shank is missing.

Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-16:
History:          Yes              Recorded Sales Price:      Yes
Current Button Owner and Location:                     No

 

 

 

 

1775 Prince of Wales Loyal Volunteers 24mm orig Shank Uncleaned Spelling error-s $170. 08-07-14 1775 Prince of Wales Loyal Volunteers 24mm orig Shank Uncleaned Spelling error-s $170. 08-07-14 r

1775 PRICE OF WALES LOYALIST VOLUNTEERS

Color: A Flat Grayish Black.
Metal: Slightly Convex, 1-Piece, High Relief Design, Gilded Copper.
Size: 16mm.
Present Condition: A Non Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong High Relief Pattern Remains.
Variation: 

Robert’s Notes: The Prince of Wales’s feathers is the heraldic badge of the Prince of Wales. It consists of Three White Ostrich Feathers emerging from a Gold Coronet. A ribbon below the coronet bears the motto Ich dien (a contraction of the German for “I serve”, ich diene). As well as being used in royal heraldry, the badge is sometimes used to symbolize Wales. There is several Regiments like the 23rd Regt. of Foot that used a variation to this loyalist pattern. The regiment numbered buttons was worn on their colors, drums, bells of arms, and Grenadiers’ caps. This is a gilded copper officers’ Prince of Wales Loyalist Volunteers button. The Price of Wales Motif, “Three Ostrich Feathers” in high relief. the The feathers are flanked on each side by a Small Banner Ribbon which reads, “ICH DIEN.” This is in German which means, “I, Serve.” The Prince of Wales is written in high relief arced around the top legend, and Loyal Vol-s
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact.

Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-15-B:
History:               Yes                Recorded Sales Price:     Yes
Current Button Owner and Location:     ~ New York ~

 

 

UNIDENTIFIED LOYALIST BUTTON SECTION

 

 

 

1776-83 British Loyalist Volunteers 14mm orig shankRJ Silversteins george washington inaugural buttons E.A. Auctions$225. june 11,2006 BCL-121776-83 British Loyalist Volunteers 14mm orig shankRJ Silversteins george washington inaugural buttons E.A. Auctions$225. june 11,2006 BCL-12r

1780’s-1815 SCOTTISH VOLUNTEERS BUTTON

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Color: Golden Ochre Brown.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Brass.

Size: 14mm. 
Cuff Button
Type: Non Military
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Fair Planchet Condition, A Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.

Isabela’s Notes: The pattern and the provenance was listed by Early American Auctions as Great Britain Rev. War Volunteers button. I am unable to determine a date or use range, but I would say 1780 forward is my best guess.  When I examined the crown I noted a Scottish Saint Andrews Cross in the center. So, without any further evidence I would have to say that it has Scottish roots, and made with a mold instead of manufactured. Since no other specimens have been reported or surfaced, it is tough to be certain. The auction house also noted it was dug in New York. The sale listing also noted there is an “RP” for Royal Provincials somewhere on the button, but i fail to detect it. So, i cannot confirm it was a Revolutionary War era volunteers button, but am fascinated by the decorative shield and crown. Most buttons with English crowns in this era usually have either a heart, rose, & cross or a combination of all three. It wasn’t until later 1812 when the crown style changed with new Royal Navy mandates. Next, the button’s pattern depicts a high relief shield with a double outline. This has me thinking that the outer outline is actually the Broad Arrow indicating English military ownership. Most likely indication possession of the initials within the shield. This is pure speculation on my part and hopefully one day I will find concrete evidence. The shield  contains the initials, ” T*L over a V “. There is a high relief  Crown surmounting the shield with a St. Andrews Cross in the center flanked by Two Catholic Crosses. The pattern is set on a plain flat field with no edge raised border. 

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original, straight, and intact. The surface is coarse, and has green encrustations.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-16:

History:     Yes                 Recorded Sales Price:     Yes
Current Button Owner and Location:                    No

Dug in New York State. 

 

 

 

18th Century Loyalist Button rj silversteins george washington inaugural buttons BCL-1718th Century Loyalist Button rj silversteins george washington inaugural buttons BCL-17r

 

18th Century Loyalist Volunteers Button

Color: A Silvery Brown.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Silvered Copper.

Size: 22mm. 
Coat Size
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Fair Planchet Condition, A Fair High Relief Pattern Remains.

Robert’s Notes: 18th Century Loyalist button. The button depict a Large Raised Lined Shield in the Center. There is a raised capital letter, ” L “ for Loyalist in calligraphy. There is a high relief Ornate Crown above the shield. The word, “Volunteers” is arced in the bottom legend.

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank.



Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-15-A:

History:     Yes                  Recorded Sales Price:           Yes

Current Button Owner and Location:                          No

 

 

1800 Silisbury Volunteer Infantry 19mm Brass no shankO11800 Silisbury Volunteer Infantry 19mm Brass no shank O

1795-1800 SALISBURY VOLUNTEER INFANTRY BUTTON

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Color: Coppery Brown.

Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Raised Design, Brass.

Size: 19mm. 
CoatButton.
Type: Volunteer Infantry.
Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Good Planchet Condition, A Good High Relief Pattern Remains.

Isabela’s Notes:  I am  not able to determine a date or use range exactly, but I would say 1790 to 1815. The button’s pattern depicts a small Decorative Crown with high relief Stipples, Three Inverted Diamonds, and Six Crosses. Directly under is three large initials, “LVI” in high relief calligraphy. The pattern is set on a plain field with no raised edge border. 

Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is broken off.

Library Records Has Limited Information on BCL-17:

History:                 Yes        Recorded Sales Price:     Yes

Current Button Owner and Location:                      No

 

 

 

1793 King & Constitution Irish Loyalsit 23mm Gilt Brass LLTK-6-B1793 King & Constitution Irish Loyalsit 23mm Gilt Brass LLTK-6-BrKings American 4th Regiment 1770's Gilt Brass 23mm orig shank

1793-1815 LOYALIST WITH CROWN & IRISH HARP

Color: Brown & Green With Gilt Highlights .
Metal: Flat, 1-Piece, Impressed Design with Raised Lettering, Silvered Copper.
Size: 23mm.
TYPE: Non Military

Present Condition: An Excavated Specimen, Strong Planchet Condition, A Strong Pattern Remains.
Robert’s Notes: This button was advertised and sold as a Revolutionary War Irish Loyalist Button; but I believe this was made Post Rev. War and geared toward Irish Loyalists to show there support for the King of England in the war with France. This is very similar to the King and Constitution Irish button I have in that section. The button’s pattern depicts a Small Ornate Crown surmounting the top of a medium size Decorative Irish Harp. The front of the harp is adorned by a Female Angel Figure. Flanking each side of the harp is a Rose Stem and Thistle Stem on a lined field. Circling the inner pattern is a Reeded Stipple Ring. This button’s pattern represents England and Ireland united under the rule of the King of England.
Reverse Button Analysis: This is a one-piece button with a loop shank. The shank is original and intact, but crushed inward. GILT with a Wreath design is stamped.

Library Records Has Limited Information on LLTK-6-B:
History:        Yes       Recorded Sales Price:                   Yes
Current Button Owner and Location:     ~ Canada ~